Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum
   You are in: Museum of History >> Hall of North and South Americans >> Daniel Garakonthie





American’s Four United Republics: Discovery-Based Curriculum

For more information go to Historic.us

 

Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889 and 1999. Virtualology.com warns that these 19th Century biographies contain errors and bias. We rely on volunteers to edit the historic biographies on a continual basis. If you would like to edit this biography please submit a rewritten biography in text form . If acceptable, the new biography will be published above the 19th Century Appleton's Cyclopedia Biography citing the volunteer editor



Virtual American Biographies

Over 30,000 personalities with thousands of 19th Century illustrations, signatures, and exceptional life stories. Virtualology.com welcomes editing and additions to the biographies. To become this site's editor or a contributor Click Here or e-mail Virtualology here.



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 



Daniel Garakonthie

Appleton's & Klos Biographies - A Stan Klos Company

 

 

GARAKONTHIE, Daniel, chief of Onondaga Indians, died in Onondaga, New York, in 1676. After the flight of the French missionaries from Onondaga in 1658, Garakonthie, who, although not yet a Christian, had examined with care the customs of the French colonists, and the doctrines of the missionaries, became openly the protector of the Christians and an earnest advocate for peace.

 

In 1661 he persuaded the Onondagas to send an embassy to Quebec, and to restore some of their captives as a preliminary to peace. Father Le Moyne accompanied the embassy on its return, and was received with great honor by Garakonthie, who converted his cabin into a chapel for the missionary. The chief then sat out on an embassy to Montreal with nine of the French prisoners. He was well received, restored his captives, and obtained the liberation of several of his countrymen.

 

On his return he baffled the efforts of the chiefs who wished to make war on the French, frustrated a plot against Le Moyne's life, and prepared to conduct the missionary and the remaining captives to the St. Lawrence in 1662. During the war that followed the departure of Le Moyne, Garakonthie endeavored to procure the release of French captives, and protected the little body of Christians at Onondaga as far as his authority extended.

 

In the spring of 1664 he succeeded in obtaining a decree of the council for another embassy, the object of which was to restore the French prisoners and solicit peace; but the French, while expressing their gratitude for the efforts of Garakonthie, avoided making terms. In August, however, an agreement was made for an exchange of prisoners, and he set out with the French captives, but his party was attacked by the Algonquins, and, after severe loss, compelled to return.

 

Although always friendly to the French, and feeling the truth of Christianity, he did not show any desire to become a Christian until 1669. Then, at a conference with the French governor in Quebec, he declared his love for Christianity, and that he renounced "polygamy, the vanity of dreams, and every kind of sin." He was baptized with great pomp in the cathedral of Quebec by Bishop Laval, the governor being his godfather, and Mlle. Bouteroue, the daughter of the intendant, his godmother, he received the name of Daniel at the font, and was then entertained with honor in the castle.

 

His conversion produced a great effect, not only at Onondaga, but in the other settlements. Some of the sachems endeavored to diminish his influence, declaring that he was no longer a man, and that the black robes had disordered his intellect; but when any embassy was to be sent, or an eloquent speaker was desired for any occasion, Garakonthie quickly recovered all his power.

 

His influence was recognized even by the English governors of New York, who asked his mediation to effect a peace between the Mohawks and Mohegans. He was frequently engaged on embassies to New York and Albany, as well as to Quebec and Montreal. He opposed the superstitions and dances of the tribes, and did much to check them.

 

When he found his end approaching he gave his last counsels to his family, and ordering the funeral banquet to be prepared, he invited to it the chiefs of Onondaga, and sang his death-song. Then he exhorted the sachems to become Christians and to banish liquor from the cantons. In order to induce his countrymen to follow his precepts, Garakonthie had adopted many European customs, and had learned to read and write, although advanced in years.

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia by John Looby, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

GARAKONTHIE, Daniel, chief of Onondaga Indians, died in Onondaga, New York, in 1676. After the flight of the French missionaries from Onondaga in 1658, Garakonthie, who, although not yet a Christian, had examined with care the customs of the French colonists, and the doctrines of the missionaries, became openly the protector of the Christians and an earnest advocate for peace. In 1661 he persuaded the Onondagas to send an embassy to Quebec, and to restore some of their captives as a preliminary to peace. Father Le Moyne accompanied the embassy on its return, and was received with great honor by Garakonthie, who converted his cabin into a chapel for the missionary. The chief then sat out on an embassy to Montreal with nine of the French prisoners. He was well received, restored his captives, and obtained the liberation of several of his countrymen. On his return he baffled the efforts of the chiefs who wished to make war on the French, frustrated a plot against Le Moyne's life, and prepared to conduct the missionary and the remaining captives to the St. Lawrence in 1662. During the war that fob lowed the departure of Le Moyne, Garakonthie endeavored to procure the release of French captives, and protected the little body of Christians at Onondaga as far as his authority extended. In the spring of 1664 he succeeded in obtaining a decree of the council for another embassy, the object of which was to restore the French prisoners and solicit peace; but the French, while expressing their gratitude for the efforts of Garakonthie, avoided making terms. In August, however, an agreement was made for an exchange of prisoners, and he set out with the French captives, but his party was attacked by the Algonquins, and, after severe loss, compelled to return. Although always friendly to the French, and feeling the truth of Christianity, he did not show any desire to become a Christian until 1669. Then, at a conference with the French governor in Quebec, he declared his love for Christianity, and that he renounced " polygamy, the vanity of dreams, and every kind of sin." He was baptized with great pomp in the cathedral of Quebec by Bishop Laval, the governor being his godfather, and Mlle. Bouteroue, the daughter of the intendant, his godmother, he received the name of Daniel at the font, and was then entertained with honor in the castle, His conversion produced a great effect, not only at Onondaga, but in the other settlements. Some of the sachems endeavored to diminish his influence, declaring that he was no longer a man, and that the black robes had disordered his intellect; but when any embassy was to be sent, or an eloquent speaker was desired for any occasion, Garakonthie quickly recovered all his power. His influence was recognized even by the English governors of New York, who asked his mediation to effect a peace between the Mohawks and Mohegans. He was frequently engaged on embassies to New York and Albany, as well as to Quebec and Montreal. He opposed the superstitions and dances of the tribes, and did much to check them. When he found his end approaching he gave his last counsels to his family, and ordering the funeral banquet to be prepared, he invited to it the chiefs of Onondaga, and sang his death-song. Then he exhorted the sachems to become Christians and to banish liquor from the cantons. In order to induce his countrymen to follow his precepts, Garakonthie had adopted many European customs, and had learned to read and write, although advanced in years.

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

Start your search on Daniel Garakonthie.


 

 


 


Unauthorized Site: This site and its contents are not affiliated, connected, associated with or authorized by the individual, family, friends, or trademarked entities utilizing any part or the subject's entire name. Any official or affiliated sites that are related to this subject will be hyper linked below upon submission and Evisum, Inc. review.

Copyright© 2000 by Evisum Inc.TM. All rights reserved.
Evisum Inc.TM Privacy Policy

Search:

About Us

 

 

Image Use

Please join us in our mission to incorporate America's Four United Republics discovery-based curriculum into the classroom of every primary and secondary school in the United States of America by July 2, 2026, the nation’s 250th birthday. , the United States of America: We The People Click Here

 

Childhood & Family

Click Here

 

Historic Documents

Articles of Association

Articles of Confederation 1775

Articles of Confederation

Article the First

Coin Act

Declaration of Independence

Declaration of Independence

Emancipation Proclamation

Gettysburg Address

Monroe Doctrine

Northwest Ordinance

No Taxation Without Representation

Thanksgiving Proclamations

Mayflower Compact

Treaty of Paris 1763

Treaty of Paris 1783

Treaty of Versailles

United Nations Charter

United States In Congress Assembled

US Bill of Rights

United States Constitution

US Continental Congress

US Constitution of 1777

US Constitution of 1787

Virginia Declaration of Rights

 

Historic Events

Battle of New Orleans

Battle of Yorktown

Cabinet Room

Civil Rights Movement

Federalist Papers

Fort Duquesne

Fort Necessity

Fort Pitt

French and Indian War

Jumonville Glen

Manhattan Project

Stamp Act Congress

Underground Railroad

US Hospitality

US Presidency

Vietnam War

War of 1812

West Virginia Statehood

Woman Suffrage

World War I

World War II

 

Is it Real?



Declaration of
Independence

Digital Authentication
Click Here

 

America’s Four Republics
The More or Less United States

 
Continental Congress
U.C. Presidents

Peyton Randolph

Henry Middleton

Peyton Randolph

John Hancock

  

Continental Congress
U.S. Presidents

John Hancock

Henry Laurens

John Jay

Samuel Huntington

  

Constitution of 1777
U.S. Presidents

Samuel Huntington

Samuel Johnston
Elected but declined the office

Thomas McKean

John Hanson

Elias Boudinot

Thomas Mifflin

Richard Henry Lee

John Hancock
[
Chairman David Ramsay]

Nathaniel Gorham

Arthur St. Clair

Cyrus Griffin

  

Constitution of 1787
U.S. Presidents

George Washington 

John Adams
Federalist Party


Thomas Jefferson
Republican* Party

James Madison 
Republican* Party

James Monroe
Republican* Party

John Quincy Adams
Republican* Party
Whig Party

Andrew Jackson
Republican* Party
Democratic Party


Martin Van Buren
Democratic Party

William H. Harrison
Whig Party

John Tyler
Whig Party

James K. Polk
Democratic Party

David Atchison**
Democratic Party

Zachary Taylor
Whig Party

Millard Fillmore
Whig Party

Franklin Pierce
Democratic Party

James Buchanan
Democratic Party


Abraham Lincoln 
Republican Party

Jefferson Davis***
Democratic Party

Andrew Johnson
Republican Party

Ulysses S. Grant 
Republican Party

Rutherford B. Hayes
Republican Party

James A. Garfield
Republican Party

Chester Arthur 
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland
Democratic Party

Benjamin Harrison
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland 
Democratic Party

William McKinley
Republican Party

Theodore Roosevelt
Republican Party

William H. Taft 
Republican Party

Woodrow Wilson
Democratic Party

Warren G. Harding 
Republican Party

Calvin Coolidge
Republican Party

Herbert C. Hoover
Republican Party

Franklin D. Roosevelt
Democratic Party

Harry S. Truman
Democratic Party

Dwight D. Eisenhower
Republican Party

John F. Kennedy
Democratic Party

Lyndon B. Johnson 
Democratic Party 

Richard M. Nixon 
Republican Party

Gerald R. Ford 
Republican Party

James Earl Carter, Jr. 
Democratic Party

Ronald Wilson Reagan 
Republican Party

George H. W. Bush
Republican Party 

William Jefferson Clinton
Democratic Party

George W. Bush 
Republican Party

Barack H. Obama
Democratic Party

Please Visit

Forgotten Founders
Norwich, CT

Annapolis Continental
Congress Society


U.S. Presidency
& Hospitality

© Stan Klos

 

 

 

 


Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum