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Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889 and 1999. Virtualology.com warns that these 19th Century biographies contain errors and bias. We rely on volunteers to edit the historic biographies on a continual basis. If you would like to edit this biography please submit a rewritten biography in text form . If acceptable, the new biography will be published above the 19th Century Appleton's Cyclopedia Biography citing the volunteer editor

 



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Genevieve Ward

WARD, Genevieve, the stage-name of LUCIA GENOVEVA TERESA, Countess GUERBEL, actress, born in New York city, 27 March, 1833. She is a granddaughter of Gideon Lee. Her childhood and youth were passed in France and Italy. When she was fifteen years old her voice attracted the interest of Rossihi, who superintended her musical education. After appearing at La Scala, Milan, in "Lucrezia Borgia," she was received with great applause at Bergamo, and afterward sang in principal roles of Italian opera at the Theatre des Italiens, Paris. Her first performances in London were in English opera. In December, 1851, she took part in the "Messiah" at Exeter hall. Having married Count Constantine Guerbel, a Russian officer, before going upon the operatic stage, she sang under the name of Madame Guerrabella. She gave Italian operas in London during the season of 1862, and at its close came to the United States, appearing in New York city and Philadelphia, and in the winter sang in Havana. Exposing herself' injudiciously to diphtheria, she caught the infection, and suffered a severe attack of the disease by which her voice was ruined for singing. For several years she taught vocal music in a school in New York, and finally she prepared herself for the dramatic stage. Being coldly received by an audience of New York critics, she sailed for England, making her first appearance on 1 October, 1873, in Manchester, as Lady Macbeth. She was successful in this part, and still more as Lady Constance in " King John," and, going to Dublin in the same year, was applauded in the roles of Adrienne Lecouvreur, Medea, and Lucrezia Borgia. Adelaide Ristori, who had been her adviser in dramatic studies, desired Miss Ward to join her Italian troupe, but she preferred to enact English plays She played Unarita in "The Prayer in the Storm " in London for six months in 1874, and was successful as Julia in " The Hunchback," and in the following year as Rebecca in " Ivanhoe." Afterward she travelled through the provinces, producing " Despite the World," by Lewis Wingfield, and "Sappho," by William G. Wills, both of which were written for her. In December. 1875, she first played" Antigone" at the Crystal Palace, Londom She went to Paris in 1877 to study under Frangois Joseph Regnier, and on 11 February gained such success in a French version of "Macbeth" that the managers of the Comedie Francaise invited her to become a member of their company. She returned to London for the season of 1878, playing Emilia in "Othello" among other parts, and in June sailed for the United States, appearing at Booth's theatre, New York city, in "Jane Shore." "Henry VIII.," and other plays. Returning to London in April, 1879, she leased the Lyceum theatre, where she failed in the double role of the heroine and the gypsy in "Zillah," but made a success in the title role of William Young's " Lucrezia Borgia " and as Stephanie in "Forget-Me-Not," which she first produced on 22 August She reappeared in the same piece at the Prince of Wales's theatre on 22 February, 1880, and on 10 May of that year performed the part of Clorinde in Emile Augier's "L'Aventuriere," which was given in French. In 1881-'2 she played "Forget-Me-Not" in the chief cities of the United States and British America, and, after reproducing the same play in London, she sailed for India in December, 1882, playing in the Australian colonies, and, after a tour around the world, returned to England in November, 1885. She has since been the lessee of the Lyceum theatre, London, but in 1888 finally retired from the stage. Her earlier career was recounted in a " Memoir of Ginevra Guerrabella," which was published anonymously by Henry Wikoff (New York, 1863), and her later in "Genevieve Ward," by Zadel-Barnes Gustafson (Boston, 1882).

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