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Gideon Olin

0LIN, Gideon, member of congress, born in Rhode Island about 1750; died in Shaftesbury, Vermont, 6 August, 1822. He settled in Shaftesbury, took an active part in the movement to secure an independent state government, and after the admission of Vermont to the Unim was elected to the legislature and chosen speaker of the house of representatives. Subsequently he was judge of the county court, and was elected to congress for two successive terms, serving from 17 October, 1803, till 3 March, 1807.--His son, Abram Baldwin, jurist, born in Shaftesbury, Vermont, in 1808; died in Washington, D. C., 7 July, 1879, was graduated at Williams in 1835, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in Troy, New York, in 1838, and for three years was recorder of that city. He practised in Troy until he was elected as a Republican to congress, and took his seat, 7 December, 1857. He was twice re-elected, serving till 3 March, 1863. In that year he was appointed a judge of the supreme court of the District of Columbia. He received the degree of LL.D. from Williams in 1865.--Gideon's nephew, Henry, jurist, born in Rhode Island in 1767; died in Salisbury, Vermont, in 1837, was brought up in Addison county as a farmer. He was sent to the legislature in 1799, and was a member of the house of representatives, except for four years, until 1825, and of the Constitutional conventions of 1814, 1822, and 1828. He was associate judge of the Addison county court in 1801-'6, and chief judge in 1807, and from 1810 till 1824. He was elected to congress to fill a vacancy, sitting from 13 December, 1824, till 3 March, 1825. In 1827-'9 he was lieutenant-governor.--Henry's son, Stephen, clergyman, born fn Leicester, Vermont, 2 March, 1797" died in Middletown, Connecticut, 16 Aunt., 1851, was graduated at Middlebury in 1820. He taught for three years in Abbeville district, South Carolina, and became while there a Methodist preacher, joined the South Carolina conference in January, 1824, and was stationed at Charleston. He became known at once as one of the most powerful and fervent preachers in the denomination, but after six months of laborious service his health failed The "Wesleyan Journal" was established for him in Charleston in October, 1825, but he was not able to assume the editorial management. He was ordained as deacon on 13 January, 1826, at Milledgeville, Georgia and on 1 January, 1827, became professor of belles-lettres in the University of Georgia, and while there preached frequently and took part in revivals, being ordained as elder on 20 November, 1828. In March, 1834, he was inaugurated as president, of Randolph Macon college, a Methodist institution that had been recently established in Mecklenburg county, Virginia, where he took charge of the department of mental and moral science, belles-lettres, and political philosophy. In 1832 he received the degree of D.D. from Middlebury college, and in 1834 from the University of Alabama and Wesleyan university. In the spring of 1837 he was forced by infirm health to take leave of the college, which had prospered greatly under his management. He spent a year in Paris, afterward some time in Italy, and then travelled through Europe, Egypt, and the Holy Land, returning to the United States in 1840. He had been elected president of Wesleyan university in 1839, but resigned in favor of Reverend Dr. Nathan Bangs, who in 1842 retired in his favor. He introduced a stringent course of discipline, restored a religious tone to the college, and secured endowments. Dr. Olin took an active part in the debates of the general conference of 1844, supporting the resolution that called upon his friend, Bishop James O. Andrew, to desist from the exercise of his office while he was connected with slavery. He was strongly censured for this action by many southerners, who recalled the fact that he had once stood in the same position as Bishop Andrew, for his first wife was an owner of slaves. He received the degree of LL. D. from Yale in 1845. He published "Travels in Egypt, Arabia Petraea, and the Holy Land" (New York, 1843). His two only baccalaureate sermons at Middletown were published soon after they were delivered (1846 and 1851), and afterward in a single volume entitled "Youthful Piety" (1853). His sermons, sketches, lectures, and addresses were printed under the title of "The Works of Stephen Olin" (1853). A book of travel entitled " Greece and t, he Golden Horn" was issued posthumously, with an introduction by Reverend John McClintoek (1854), and later a work called "College Life, its Theory and Practice" (1867). See "Life and Letters of Stephen Olin" (New York, 1853).--Stephen's wife, Julia Matilda, author, born in New York city, 14 December, 1814; died there, 1 May, 1879, was a daughter of Judge James Lynch, of New York, and married Dr. Olin in October, 1843. She had been a communicant of the Protestant Episcopal church from her youth, but united with the Methodist church after her marriage, and thenceforth took an active interest in missionary and Sunday-school work. Mrs. Olin founded Hillside chapel in 1855, near her summer home at Rhine beck, New York, was secretary of the New York female Bible society from 1854, and from its origin in 1869 was president of the New York branch of the Woman's foreign missionary society. She contributed to the "Methodist Quarterly Review" and other denominational publications, edited Dr. Olin's "Works" and his "Greece and the Golden Horn," the proceeds of which were given for a prize fund in Wesleyan university, and wrote his "Life." She published for the benefit of the chapel at Rhinebeck a book of poetical selections called "Hillside Flowers," and was the author of "Words of the Wise" (New York, 1851); "A String of Pearls" (185;5), containing scripture texts and illustrations; Sun(lay-school stories entitled "Four Days in July" (1855); "A Winter at Woodlawn" (1856); " What Norman Saw in the West" (1859) ; and " Hawk Hollow Stories" (1863); and books for Sunday-school instruction entitled "Curious and Useful Questions on the Bible" (1849, 1851, 1861); a volume of biographical sketches of eminent Christian women entitled "The Perfect Light, or Seven Hues of Christian Character" (1865) ; "Questions on Lessons "; and "Questions on the Natural History of the Bible " (1865).

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