Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum
   You are in: Museum of History >> Hall of North and South Americans >> Harry Croswell





American’s Four United Republics: Discovery-Based Curriculum

For more information go to Historic.us

 

Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889 and 1999. Virtualology.com warns that these 19th Century biographies contain errors and bias. We rely on volunteers to edit the historic biographies on a continual basis. If you would like to edit this biography please submit a rewritten biography in text form . If acceptable, the new biography will be published above the 19th Century Appleton's Cyclopedia Biography citing the volunteer editor





Virtual American Biographies

Over 30,000 personalities with thousands of 19th Century illustrations, signatures, and exceptional life stories. Virtualology.com welcomes editing and additions to the biographies. To become this site's editor or a contributor Click Here or e-mail Virtualology here.



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 



Harry Croswell

CROSWELL, Harry, clergyman, born in West Hartford, Connecticut, 16 June 1778; died in New Haven, Connecticut, 13 March 1858. He was educated under the care of Rev. Dr. Perkins and Dr. Noah Webster. When quite young, he entered his brother's printing office in Catskill, New York, and soon became editor of a paper issued there. He founded a Federalist newspaper called the "Balance" in Hudson, New York, in 1802, which became noted for the bitterness and scathing sarcasm of its editorials; and Mr. Croswell became involved in many libel suits. The most celebrated of these was caused by an article on Jefferson, published in the "Wasp," a paper controlled by Mr. Croswell, and Alexander Hamilton's last and one of his finest speeches was made in Croswell's defense at the trial. Croswell afterward edited a political newspaper in Albany; whither he removed in 1809 and was again prosecuted for libel by a Mr. South-wick, who recovered damages. Croswell called on his friends for money to make good this amount, and on their refusal determined to enter the ministry of the Protestant Episcopal Church, though he had been brought up a Congregationalist. He was ordained deacon, 8 May 1814, and had charge of Christ Church, Hudson, till 1 Jan., 1815, when he became rector of Trinity Church, New Haven, Connecticut, then the only Episcopal Church in the City, holding services in an old wooden building on Church Street till the opening of the new Church edifice, on 22 February 1816. He remained in New Haven till his death.

One who knew him writes: "His tall figure and manly form, clerical garb, and high-topped boots with knee-buckles, impressed every beholder as they saw him walk the Streets of New Haven. He was not a great preacher, but he had an extraordinary knowledge of human nature, and could ingratiate himself into every man's heart." Trinity College gave him the degree of D.D. in 1831. He published " Young Churchman's Guide "(4 vols.); "Manual of Family Prayers" (New Haven); "Guide to the Holy Sacrament "; and a "Memoir" of his son, Rev. William Croswell, D.D. (New York, 1854). He left in manuscript "Annals of Trinity Church" and a voluminous diary. See "Letters of Waldegrave," by Rev. G. W. Nichols (New York, 1886).--His son, William, clergyman, born in Hudson, New York, 7 November 1804; died in Boston, Massachusetts, 9 November 1851, was graduated at Yale in 1822, taught a select school in New Haven, with an elder brother, and in 1824 was engaged with his cousin, Edwin Croswell, as assistant editor of the Albany "Argus."

He entered the General theological seminary in New York in 1826, and pursued his studies with Bishop Brownell, in Hartford, in 1827, at the same time editing the "Episcopal Watchman." He was ordained in 1828, and, after holding several pastorates, became rector of the recently organized Church of the Advent in Boston, where he remained till his death. His manner of conducting the Church services led to a controversy with Bishop Eastburn, by whom he was officially censured. His life was one of charity and religious devotion. Trinity College gave him the degree of D. D. in 1846. He wrote numerous short lyrical poems, some of which were published in his father's memoirs of him, and his "Poems, Sacred and Secular," were edited, with a memoir, by Rev. A. Cleveland Coxe, D.D. (New York, 1859).

--Harry Croswell's nephew, Edwin Croswell, journalist, born in Catskill, N. Y., 29 May 1797; died in Princeton, N.J., 13 June 1871, became assistant editor of his father's paper, the "Catskill Recorder," his first article being a defense and vindication of the soldiers drafted for the defense of New York during the war of 1812. After the retirement of his father, his management of the "Recorder" attracted the attention of the democratic leaders, and in 1824 he was invited to Albany by Martin Van Buren, Benjamin F. Butler, 'and others, to edit the "Argus," and also to become state printer. 3Ir. Croswell remained in Albany thirty years, changed the " Argus" from a semi-weekly to a daily journal, and made it one of the chief democratic organs in the country. As a member of the so-called "Albany Regency," a group of politicians who directed the party councils in the state, it was his duty to preserve order in the ranks through the columns of his journal, and to his tact in performing this duty may be largely ascribed the position of the democrats in New York at that time. The leading articles in the "Argus" were copied in the minor party papers throughout the state as embodying all that was sound of democratic principles, and for many years it was regarded as political apostasy to question the authority of the party organ. When the Whigs obtained possession of the state in 1840, Mr. Croswell was succeeded in the office of state printer by Thurlow Weed, but held it again from 1844 till 1847. Subsequently he found himself opposed to Martin Van Buren and others of his early political associates, through a split in the party. He retired from journalism in 1854 and engaged in business in New York. He published numerous addresses.

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

Start your search on Harry Croswell.


 

 


 


Unauthorized Site: This site and its contents are not affiliated, connected, associated with or authorized by the individual, family, friends, or trademarked entities utilizing any part or the subject's entire name. Any official or affiliated sites that are related to this subject will be hyper linked below upon submission and Evisum, Inc. review.

Copyright© 2000 by Evisum Inc.TM. All rights reserved.
Evisum Inc.TM Privacy Policy

Search:

About Us

 

 

Image Use

Please join us in our mission to incorporate America's Four United Republics discovery-based curriculum into the classroom of every primary and secondary school in the United States of America by July 2, 2026, the nation’s 250th birthday. , the United States of America: We The People Click Here

 

Childhood & Family

Click Here

 

Historic Documents

Articles of Association

Articles of Confederation 1775

Articles of Confederation

Article the First

Coin Act

Declaration of Independence

Declaration of Independence

Emancipation Proclamation

Gettysburg Address

Monroe Doctrine

Northwest Ordinance

No Taxation Without Representation

Thanksgiving Proclamations

Mayflower Compact

Treaty of Paris 1763

Treaty of Paris 1783

Treaty of Versailles

United Nations Charter

United States In Congress Assembled

US Bill of Rights

United States Constitution

US Continental Congress

US Constitution of 1777

US Constitution of 1787

Virginia Declaration of Rights

 

Historic Events

Battle of New Orleans

Battle of Yorktown

Cabinet Room

Civil Rights Movement

Federalist Papers

Fort Duquesne

Fort Necessity

Fort Pitt

French and Indian War

Jumonville Glen

Manhattan Project

Stamp Act Congress

Underground Railroad

US Hospitality

US Presidency

Vietnam War

War of 1812

West Virginia Statehood

Woman Suffrage

World War I

World War II

 

Is it Real?



Declaration of
Independence

Digital Authentication
Click Here

 

America’s Four Republics
The More or Less United States

 
Continental Congress
U.C. Presidents

Peyton Randolph

Henry Middleton

Peyton Randolph

John Hancock

  

Continental Congress
U.S. Presidents

John Hancock

Henry Laurens

John Jay

Samuel Huntington

  

Constitution of 1777
U.S. Presidents

Samuel Huntington

Samuel Johnston
Elected but declined the office

Thomas McKean

John Hanson

Elias Boudinot

Thomas Mifflin

Richard Henry Lee

John Hancock
[
Chairman David Ramsay]

Nathaniel Gorham

Arthur St. Clair

Cyrus Griffin

  

Constitution of 1787
U.S. Presidents

George Washington 

John Adams
Federalist Party


Thomas Jefferson
Republican* Party

James Madison 
Republican* Party

James Monroe
Republican* Party

John Quincy Adams
Republican* Party
Whig Party

Andrew Jackson
Republican* Party
Democratic Party


Martin Van Buren
Democratic Party

William H. Harrison
Whig Party

John Tyler
Whig Party

James K. Polk
Democratic Party

David Atchison**
Democratic Party

Zachary Taylor
Whig Party

Millard Fillmore
Whig Party

Franklin Pierce
Democratic Party

James Buchanan
Democratic Party


Abraham Lincoln 
Republican Party

Jefferson Davis***
Democratic Party

Andrew Johnson
Republican Party

Ulysses S. Grant 
Republican Party

Rutherford B. Hayes
Republican Party

James A. Garfield
Republican Party

Chester Arthur 
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland
Democratic Party

Benjamin Harrison
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland 
Democratic Party

William McKinley
Republican Party

Theodore Roosevelt
Republican Party

William H. Taft 
Republican Party

Woodrow Wilson
Democratic Party

Warren G. Harding 
Republican Party

Calvin Coolidge
Republican Party

Herbert C. Hoover
Republican Party

Franklin D. Roosevelt
Democratic Party

Harry S. Truman
Democratic Party

Dwight D. Eisenhower
Republican Party

John F. Kennedy
Democratic Party

Lyndon B. Johnson 
Democratic Party 

Richard M. Nixon 
Republican Party

Gerald R. Ford 
Republican Party

James Earl Carter, Jr. 
Democratic Party

Ronald Wilson Reagan 
Republican Party

George H. W. Bush
Republican Party 

William Jefferson Clinton
Democratic Party

George W. Bush 
Republican Party

Barack H. Obama
Democratic Party

Please Visit

Forgotten Founders
Norwich, CT

Annapolis Continental
Congress Society


U.S. Presidency
& Hospitality

© Stan Klos

 

 

 

 


Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum