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Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889 and 1999. Virtualology.com warns that these 19th Century biographies contain errors and bias. We rely on volunteers to edit the historic biographies on a continual basis. If you would like to edit this biography please submit a rewritten biography in text form . If acceptable, the new biography will be published above the 19th Century Appleton's Cyclopedia Biography citing the volunteer editor



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Hugh Waddell

WADDELL, Hugh, soldier, born in Lisburn, County Down, Ireland, in 1734; died in Castle Haynes, New Hanover County, North Carolina, 9 April, 1773. He emigrated to North Carolina in 1753, was clerk of the council in 1754-'5, lieutenant in Colonel James Innes's regiment in the Virginia campaign of 1754, became captain in 1755, built Fort Dobbs, and commanded there in 1756-'7. He led the North Carolina detachment with the rank of major in the expedition to Fort Du Quesne in 1758, and became colonel the next year. In November, 1765, he led the armed resistance to the landing at Brunswick of the English sloop-of-war "Diligence," which contained the government stamps, seized the ship's boat, and forced Governor Tryon to deliver to the people William Houston, the stamp-master, from whom they exacted a pledge, which he signed in the market-place, that he would "never receive any stamped paper which might arrive from England, nor officiate in any way in the distribution of stamps in the province of North Carolina." This act of patriotism was of not less importance in the history of pre-Revolutionary movements in North Carolina than the Boston tea-party in Massachusetts. In 1771 he commanded the expedition against the Regulators with the rank of major-general. During the intervals of his military career he frequently served in the legislature.--His grandson, Hugh, lawyer, born in Newfields, Bladen County, North Carolina, in 1799; died in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1 November, 1878, was graduated at the University of North Carolina in 1818, and studied medicine, but abandoned it for law, attaining high rank in that profession. He represented Orange county in the legislature in 1828, was speaker of the state senate in 1836-'7, and again a member of that body in 1844-'6. He was an eloquent debater and an accomplished man of letters.--His son, Alfred Moore, lawyer, born in Hillsborough, North Carolina, 16 September, 1834, was graduated at the University of North Carolina in 1853, studied law, and was admitted to the bar. He became clerk of the court of equity of New Hanover county, North Carolina, edited the " Wilmington Herald" in 1860, and the same year was a delegate to the Conservative-Union convention which nominated John Bell for president. During the civil war he served in the Confederate army as lieutenant-colonel of cavalry. He was chosen to congress as a Democrat in 1870, served by reelection till 1879, and was chairman of the committee on post-offices and post-roads in the 44th congress. He was defeated in the next election, and resumed the practice of law. He has in manuscript "A Colonial Officer and his Times."--The second Hugh's nephew, James Iredell, naval officer, born in Pittsboro', Chatham County, North Carolina, in 1824; died in Annapolis, Maryland, 15 March, 1886, on 10 September, 1841, was appointed a midshipman in the U, S. navy, and in May, 1842, he received a wound in a duel which incapacitated him from service for eleven months and lamed him for life. .He did good service in the war with Mexico, was graduated at the naval academy at Annapolis in 1847, and while on a cruise on the Brazilian station in September, 1855, was promoted from passed midshipman to 2d lieutenant and navigator of the "Germantown." He was detached and served on the store-ship "Release " at Aspinwall during the building of the Panama railroad, where he contracted the yellow fever. The ship went to sea and day by day the officers and crew were stricken down by the disease, until Lieutenant Waddell was the only officer left to command her with a few convalescent seamen. The vessel finally reached Boston. He afterward was on duty at the naval academy, as assistant professor of navigation, until 11 July, 1859. In the spring of 1860 he sailed in the "Saginaw" for the China station, where he led a successful expedition. On 20 November, 1861, he forwarded his resignation to the secretary of the navy, but on 11 January, 1862, when he arrived in New York, he was offered a command in the United States bomb-fleet, then being fitted out for an attack on New Orleans, which he declined. In February, 1862, he ran the blockade from Annapolis to Richmond, where he entered the Confederate navy, his commission as lieutenant being dated 27 March, 1862. He was assigned to duty on board the ram "Louisiana " at New Orleans, and when the Confederate fleet at that port was dispersed by Farragut, Lieutenant Wad-dell was sent back to destroy the "Louisiana," which he did by blowing her up. He then served at Drewry's Bluff, on James river, as ordnance of-ricer, and afterward at Charleston, South Carolina, and subsequently was ordered to England to take command of one of the cruisers that was fitting out at Liverpool. He arrived there in May, 1863, and on 5 October, 1864, was ordered to the command of the "Shenandoah" for a cruise in the Pacific ocean. She was originally a British merchant steamer. The "Shenandoah" was commissioned off Madeira, 19 October, 1864, and steered for Australia. Before arriving at Melbourne, 25 January, 1865, Commander Waddell made nine captures. The "Shenandoah " left that port, 8 February, 1865, and in three months began her destructive work among the whalers in the Okhotsk sea, Bering sea, and the Arctic ocean. Long after the fall of the Confederate government he captured and sank or burned vessels until 2 August, 1865, more than three months after the surrender of General Lee, when he met with the British bark " Barracouta," from whose captain he heard of the close of the war. After this he stowed away his guns in the hold and at once sailed for Liverpool, where he surrendered the ship to the British government. He and his crew were liberated, and on 10 November, 1865, the "Shenandoah" was delivered to the United States consul at Liverpool. The sultan of Zanzibar afterward bought her, and several years later she went down in a gale with all on board. The "Shenandoah," while under Commander Waddell, captured thirty-eight vessels, of which she released six on bond and destroyed thirty-two. She was the only vessel that carried the flag of the Confederacy around the world. After the release of Waddell he remained in Liverpool, and then went to Paris to reside. He afterward returned to the United States, and in 1875 was made commander of the "San Francisco," of the Pacific mail line between Yokohama and San Francisco. On 16 May, 1877, his steamer struck on a rock and sank. All the passengers were saved, and the captain was the last to leave the ship.

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