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Isidor Loewenthal

LOEWENTHAL, Isidor, missionary, born in Posen, Prussian Poland, in 1826; died in Peshawur, India. 27 April, 1864. He was educated in the Jewish faith, and, after completing his studies in the gymnasium of Posen, entered a mercantile establishment as a clerk. In consequence of a political poem that he published he was compelled to flee the country. He arrived in New York in the autumn of 1846, and attracted the attention of a clergyman in Wilmington, Delaware, through whose efforts he was appointed professor of German in Lafayette college. He quickly mastered the English language, entered the senior class in the following year, acting at the same time as tutor of French, German, and Hebrew, and was graduated in 1848. He then taught for four years at Mount Holly collegiate school, New Jersey, while pursuing philological studies, which he afterward continued in connection with theology at Princeton seminary, where he obtained a scholarship in 1852. After graduation in 1855 he offered his services to the Presbyterian board of missions, was ordained an evangelist in New York, and departed for India in August, 1856, with the object of establishing a mission among the Afghans of the Punjaub. He acquired with readiness the Pushtu or Afghan language, and learned to preach also in Persian, Arabic, and Hindustani. In the seven years of his missionary life at Peshawur he published a translation of the New Testament in Pushtu, and nearly completed a dictionary of that language. He contributed to American and British quarterlies, collected a valuable library of oriental literature, and acquired such acquaintance with the life and manners and the religious and political sentiments of the peoples of northern India that his services were sometimes solicited by the Indian government. He was accidentally slain, in his garden at night, by an attendant, who mistook him for a robber. LOGAN, Benjamin, pioneer, born in Augusta county, Virginia, about 1752; died in Shelby county, Kentucky, 11 December, 1802. He was the son of Irish parents who had removed to Virginia from Pennsylvania. His father died intestate when the son was fourteen years old, and left the family to his care. He was the eldest son, and by the laws of England, which were then in force in Virginia, was heir to the entire estate; but he divided it with his mother, brothers, and sisters. He then went westward, purchased and cultivated a farm on Holston river, and soon afterward married. When twenty-one years old he accompanied Colonel Henry Bouquet as sergeant in his expedition against the northern Indians, and in 1774 he served in the Dunmore war. In 1775 he joined Daniel Boone and others, who were then on their way to Kentucky. When they were near their destination, Logan separated from the main party and began the construction of the stockade that was known afterward as Logan's Fort, whither in 1776 he removed his family. It was one mile east of Stanford, Kentucky, and its site is styled to-day St. Asaph's Spring. On 20 May, 1777, Logan's Fort was invested by Indians in ambush, and at the morning's milking the men who stood guard were fired upon, and one killed and one mortally and a third helplessly wounded. The others escaped with the women to Fort Harrison. The third wounded man was rescued by Logan, who took him in his arms and bore him within the walls, amidst a shower of bullets. The garrison was thirty-five--men, women, and children --and the defence was now but twelve guns. The siege lasted for weeks, and the ammunition ran low. Logan selected two trusty comrades, crept out of the fort at nightfall, leaving but nine guns to defend it, and, pursuing unbeaten paths through the forest, reached Holston, 150 miles distant, where he obtained supplies. At last, in September, a re-enforcement of 100 well-armed mounted men raised the siege. Afterward Logan repeatedly led his men in pursuit of predatory bands of savages in his vicinity. On one occasion his right arm was broken by a bullet, and he barely escaped with his life. Logan was second in command under Colonel John Bowman of an expedition against the Shawnees, and with 150 men invested the town of Chillieothe on one side, while Bowman, with an equal number, was to attack the opposite side. After waiting all night for the signal, Logan's party assaulted the village in the morning; but at this moment, when victory seemed assured, a messenger arrived from Colonel Bowmarr with orders to retreat. Logan's men were soon found, and united themselves to Bowman's party, who, from some strange panic of their commander, had stood all night near the spot where Logan had left them. By great exertions some degree of order was restored and the retreat begun. The Indians surrounded and assailed them furiously on all sides. Logan and his aides formed the men in a large hollow square, and after several combats drove off the savages. A part of Chillicothe, with much property, was destroyed, and 160 horses brought away. The next important affair in which General Logan engaged was to lead the main body of volunteer re-enforcements to the relief of Bryan's station, and the pursuit of the savages under Simon Girty. The haste of the advanced guard in not waiting for Logan's party led to the fatal battle of the Blue Licks. In 1788 Logan led a force of 600 men against the northwestern Indian towns, engaged in several skirmishes, and destroyed many houses and large fields of growing crops. For the remainder of his life he quietly pursued his favorite occupation of farming in Shelby county, where he had removed. He took an active interest in public affairs, and was a member of the conventions that framed the first constitution of 1792 and that of 1799. He repeatedly held a seat in the legislature. Logan is described as six feet two or three inches in height, powerfully framed, of iron nerves and will, and great courage. His brother, John, for years his comrade and friend, was a leader in the military events of his day, several times a legislator, and secretary of state-of Kentucky.--Benjamin's eldest son, William, jurist, born in Harrod's Fort, Kentucky, 8 December, 1776; died in Shelby. county, Kentucky, 8 August, 1822, was probably the first white child born in Kentucky. General Logan had brought out his wife from Logan's Fort but a few months before the birth of William, and placed her at the safer station. He removed with his father's family in early life front Lincoln to Shelby county, where he resided until his death. At twenty-three he was a member of the second Constitutional convention of 1799. He was educated at the best schools of the country, prepared himself by a course of study for the practice of law, and rapidly attained eminence in the profession. He was a legislator from Shelby county, and twice appointed judge of the appellate court of Kentucky, under the powers: conferred on the governor before the adoption of the present constitution in 1849. In 1820 he was elected to the United States senate, but resigned before his term expired to accept a nomination for governor, in which contest he was defeated by John Adair.

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