Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum
   You are in: Museum of History >> Hall of North and South Americans >> James Gordon Bennett





American’s Four United Republics: Discovery-Based Curriculum

For more information go to Historic.us

 

Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889 and 1999. Virtualology.com warns that these 19th Century biographies contain errors and bias. We rely on volunteers to edit the historic biographies on a continual basis. If you would like to edit this biography please submit a rewritten biography in text form . If acceptable, the new biography will be published above the 19th Century Appleton's Cyclopedia Biography citing the volunteer editor





Virtual American Biographies

Over 30,000 personalities with thousands of 19th Century illustrations, signatures, and exceptional life stories. Virtualology.com welcomes editing and additions to the biographies. To become this site's editor or a contributor Click Here or e-mail Virtualology here.



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 



James Gordon Bennett

BENNETT, James Gordon, journalist, born in New Mill, near Keith, Scotland," 1 September 1795; died in New York City, 1 June 1872. His parents were Roman Catholics of French descent, and when he was fourteen years old he was sent to Aberdeen to study for the priesthood; but, convinced that he had mistaken his vocation, he determined to emigrate, and in April 1819, he landed at Halifax, Nova Scotia, where he attempted to earn a living by teaching book-keeping. Failing in that, he made his way to Boston, where he found employment as a proof-reader. About 1822 he went to New York, and contributed to the newspapers, then became assistant in the office of the Charleston "Courier," and in 1824 returned to New York and attempted to establish a commercial school, and then to lecture on political economy, but was unsuccessful, and again turned to the newspapers, becoming a reporter, paragraphist, and contributor of poetry and all kinds of articles. In 1825 he bought on credit the "Sunday Courier," but soon gave it up. The next year he became connected with the "National Advocate," but left it because of its advocacy of the election of John Q. Adams, and became associate editor on Noah's "Enquirer." About this time he joined the Tammany society. In 1828 he went to Washington as correspondent for the "Enquirer," and sent a series of lively personal letters that were widely copied. At his suggestion the "Enquirer" was consolidated with another paper, becoming the "Courier and Enquirer," which, with James Watson Webb for editor and Bennett as his assistant, became the leading American newspaper. When it deserted Jackson for Nicholas Biddle, Bennett left it, and started a cheap party paper that existed only thirty days, and then a Jackson organ in Philadelphia, called the "Pennsylvanian." He appealed to the party to sustain this paper, and, being refused, returned to New York, and, determined to trust no more to politicians, on 6 May 1835, issued the first number of the "Herald," a small four-page sheet, sold for a cent a copy. Two young printers, Anderson and Smith, agreed to print it, and share the profits and losses with the editor. Bennett wrote the entire newspaper, making up for the lack of news by sensational opinions, fictitious intelligence, and reckless personal attacks. The paper became popular, although it offended all parties and all creeds. On 13 June 1835, he introduced a money-article, then a novel feature in American journalism. The next month the printing-office was burned, and Smith and Anderson abandoned the enterprise; but on 31 August Bennett revived the paper, of which he was thenceforth sole proprietor. The great fire of 16 December 1835, was reported with the fullness of incident and detail that has since become characteristic of American newspaper reports. In 1838 he engaged European journalists as regular correspondents, and extended the system to the principal American cities. He systematically employed newsboys to distribute his paper. The personal encounters in which he became involved through his lampoons were described in the same lively and picturesque style. In 1841 the income of the paper was at least $100,000. In 1846 a long speech by Clay was telegraphed to the "Herald." During the civil war its circulation more than doubled. It employed sixty-three war correspondents. Its expenditures for correspondence and news were disproportionate to its payment for editorial and critical matter. It was as a collector of news that Mr. Bennett mainly excelled. He had an unerring judgment of its pecuniary value. He knew how to select the subject that engrossed the interest of the people, and to give them all the details they could desire. He had also a method of impressing the importance of news upon others in his employ. No exchange editor was so close a reader as he of the great papers of the country. He clipped passages for insertion or for texts for editorials or special articles, and when he visited the office it was to unpack his mind of the suggestions stored there by reading the exchanges. He seldom gave an editorial writer more than the suggestions for an article, and he required his co-laborers to meet him daily for consultation and the distribution of topics. When another person presided, the several editors made suggestions" when Bennett himself was present, the editors became mere listeners, and wrote, as it were, at his dictation. The "Memoirs of J. G. Bennett and his Times" was published in New York in 1855. See Hudson's "Journalism in the United States" (New York, 1872). On 6 June 1840, Mr. Bennett married Miss Henrietta Agnes Crean, a poor, but accomplished, music-teacher in New York. She died in Italy, 31 March 1873.*James Gordon, Jr., born in New York City, 10 May 1841, the only son of the founder of the "Herald," became the proprietor of the newspaper upon the death of his father. He resides mostly in Paris, and gives his attention chiefly to superintending the collection of foreign news. He added to the fame of his paper by publishing in England storm-warnings transmitted from the United States, by fitting out the "Jeanette" polar expedition, by sending Henry M. Stanley in search of Livingstone, and by other similar enterprises. In 1883 he associated himself with John W. Mackay in forming the commercial cable company and laying a new cable between America and Europe, to compete with the combined English and French lines. He has taken much interest in sports, especially in yachting, and in 1866 he took part in a memorable race from Sandy Hook to the Needles, Isle of Wight, which was won by his schooner, the "Henrietta," in 13 days 21 hours and 55 minutes, against two competing yachts. In 1870 he sailed another race across the Atlantic from Queenstown to New York in his yacht, the "Dauntless," but was beaten by the English "Cambria," which arrived only two hours in advance.

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

Start your search on James Gordon Bennett.


 

 


 


Unauthorized Site: This site and its contents are not affiliated, connected, associated with or authorized by the individual, family, friends, or trademarked entities utilizing any part or the subject's entire name. Any official or affiliated sites that are related to this subject will be hyper linked below upon submission and Evisum, Inc. review.

Copyright© 2000 by Evisum Inc.TM. All rights reserved.
Evisum Inc.TM Privacy Policy

Search:

About Us

 

 

Image Use

Please join us in our mission to incorporate America's Four United Republics discovery-based curriculum into the classroom of every primary and secondary school in the United States of America by July 2, 2026, the nation’s 250th birthday. , the United States of America: We The People Click Here

 

Childhood & Family

Click Here

 

Historic Documents

Articles of Association

Articles of Confederation 1775

Articles of Confederation

Article the First

Coin Act

Declaration of Independence

Declaration of Independence

Emancipation Proclamation

Gettysburg Address

Monroe Doctrine

Northwest Ordinance

No Taxation Without Representation

Thanksgiving Proclamations

Mayflower Compact

Treaty of Paris 1763

Treaty of Paris 1783

Treaty of Versailles

United Nations Charter

United States In Congress Assembled

US Bill of Rights

United States Constitution

US Continental Congress

US Constitution of 1777

US Constitution of 1787

Virginia Declaration of Rights

 

Historic Events

Battle of New Orleans

Battle of Yorktown

Cabinet Room

Civil Rights Movement

Federalist Papers

Fort Duquesne

Fort Necessity

Fort Pitt

French and Indian War

Jumonville Glen

Manhattan Project

Stamp Act Congress

Underground Railroad

US Hospitality

US Presidency

Vietnam War

War of 1812

West Virginia Statehood

Woman Suffrage

World War I

World War II

 

Is it Real?



Declaration of
Independence

Digital Authentication
Click Here

 

America’s Four Republics
The More or Less United States

 
Continental Congress
U.C. Presidents

Peyton Randolph

Henry Middleton

Peyton Randolph

John Hancock

  

Continental Congress
U.S. Presidents

John Hancock

Henry Laurens

John Jay

Samuel Huntington

  

Constitution of 1777
U.S. Presidents

Samuel Huntington

Samuel Johnston
Elected but declined the office

Thomas McKean

John Hanson

Elias Boudinot

Thomas Mifflin

Richard Henry Lee

John Hancock
[
Chairman David Ramsay]

Nathaniel Gorham

Arthur St. Clair

Cyrus Griffin

  

Constitution of 1787
U.S. Presidents

George Washington 

John Adams
Federalist Party


Thomas Jefferson
Republican* Party

James Madison 
Republican* Party

James Monroe
Republican* Party

John Quincy Adams
Republican* Party
Whig Party

Andrew Jackson
Republican* Party
Democratic Party


Martin Van Buren
Democratic Party

William H. Harrison
Whig Party

John Tyler
Whig Party

James K. Polk
Democratic Party

David Atchison**
Democratic Party

Zachary Taylor
Whig Party

Millard Fillmore
Whig Party

Franklin Pierce
Democratic Party

James Buchanan
Democratic Party


Abraham Lincoln 
Republican Party

Jefferson Davis***
Democratic Party

Andrew Johnson
Republican Party

Ulysses S. Grant 
Republican Party

Rutherford B. Hayes
Republican Party

James A. Garfield
Republican Party

Chester Arthur 
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland
Democratic Party

Benjamin Harrison
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland 
Democratic Party

William McKinley
Republican Party

Theodore Roosevelt
Republican Party

William H. Taft 
Republican Party

Woodrow Wilson
Democratic Party

Warren G. Harding 
Republican Party

Calvin Coolidge
Republican Party

Herbert C. Hoover
Republican Party

Franklin D. Roosevelt
Democratic Party

Harry S. Truman
Democratic Party

Dwight D. Eisenhower
Republican Party

John F. Kennedy
Democratic Party

Lyndon B. Johnson 
Democratic Party 

Richard M. Nixon 
Republican Party

Gerald R. Ford 
Republican Party

James Earl Carter, Jr. 
Democratic Party

Ronald Wilson Reagan 
Republican Party

George H. W. Bush
Republican Party 

William Jefferson Clinton
Democratic Party

George W. Bush 
Republican Party

Barack H. Obama
Democratic Party

Please Visit

Forgotten Founders
Norwich, CT

Annapolis Continental
Congress Society


U.S. Presidency
& Hospitality

© Stan Klos

 

 

 

 


Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum