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Jeremiah Day

DAY, Jeremiah, clergyman, born in Colchester, Connecticut, 26 January 1738; died in Connecticut, 12 September 1806. He was descended from Robert Day, who emigrated from England in 1634, and whose name is recorded upon a monument erected to the memory of the first settlers of Hartford the 1st Congregational Church of that City. His father, Thomas, great-grandson of Robert Day, settled upon a farm, and, on discovering the boy's fondness for study, sent him to Yale, where he was graduated in 1756. After leaving College, he taught in Sharon until he began his clerical studies, in 1757, with the Rev. Joseph Bellamy, of Bethlehem. Having a valuable farm on Sharon mountain left to him by his brother's will, he occupied it, and devoted his life to mathematical and ethical studies, as well as to agricultural labor. In reference to this period he afterward wrote a "Poem on the Pleasures of a Country Life." After the death of his wife he resolved again to devote his life to the ministry, and resumed his theological studies, under the direction of the Rev. Cotton Mather Smith.

In September 1769, he was licensed to preach, and ordained pastor of the Congregational Church in New Preston, Conn. He was one of the first missionaries from Connecticut to the new settlements in the country, making his first tour in 1788. At the Commencement of Yale in 1'791 he preached the "Conscio ad Clerum," his subject being the eternal preexistence of the world. Mr. Day published a sermon delivered before the Litchfield County association on the "Wisdom of God in the Permission of Sin" (1774). There is a volume of his discourses entitled "Sermons Collected" (1797). He also planned a long poem, "The Vision of St. John," which was not published. He was one of the editors of the "Connecticut Evangelical Magazine " from its establishment until his death.

His son, Jeremiah Day, educator, born in New Preston, Connecticut, 3 August 1773; died in New Haven, Connecticut, 22 August 1867. He was graduated at Yale with high honor in 1795. When Dr. Dwight was appointed president of that College, Mr. Day was invited to be his successor as headmaster in Greenfield school, where he remained one year. The following year he became a tutor at Williams, where he remained until 1798, when he was offered a similar place at Yale. He began to preach as a candidate for the ministry, but before taking charge of any parish was elected to the professorship of mathematics and natural philosophy at Yale, in 1801, but was not able to enter upon these new duties until 1803. He was made president of Yale in 1817, which office he held until his resignation in 1846. Having previously studied theology, Dr. Day was ordained the same day that he was inaugurated president. In 1817 he received the degree of LL.D. from Middlebury, in 1.818 the degree of D.D. from Union, and the latter also from Harvard in 1831. His learning and talents, united with kindness of heart and soundness of judgment, secured the respect of his pupils as well as their affection. He published "Algebra" in 1814, which passed through numerous editions, the latest of which was issued in 1852, by the joint labors of himself and Professor Stanley. He wrote also "Mensuration of Superficies and Solids " (1814); "An Examination of President Edwards's Inquiry as to the Freedora of the Will" (1814); "Plane Trigonometry" (1815); " Navigation and Surveying" (1817); "An Inquiry on the Self determining Power of the Will, or Contingent Volition" (1838; 2d ed., 1849); and occasional sermons. He contributed papers to the "American Journal of Science and Arts," the "New Englander," and other periodicals. An address commemorative of his life and services was delivered by President Woolsey (1867).

His daughter, Martha Day, poet, born in New Haven, Connecticut, 13 February 1813 ; died there, 2 December 1833, attained great proficiency in mathematics and languages. A collection of her "Literary Remains, with Memorials of her Life and Character," was published by her friend and relative, Professor Kingsley (New Haven, 1834).

Henry Noble Day, clergyman and author, nephew of the second Jeremiah, born in New Preston, Connecticut, 4 August 1808, was graduated at Yale in 1828, and was tutor there from 1831 till 1834. He then traveled for fifteen months in Europe, and in 1836 was appointed pastor of the 1st Congregational Church in Waterbury, Connecticut, where he remained until 1840. He was professor of rhetoric and homiletics in Western Reserve College, Ohio, from 1840 till 1858. During that time he was engaged in the management of the Cleveland and Pittsburgh railroad, and for ten years, that, with three important connecting railroads (of two of which he was president) occupied his time. In 1858 he became president of Ohio female College, where he remained until his resignation in 1864. Professor Day has published " The Art of Elocution" (New Haven, 1844; revised ed., Cincinnati, 1860); "Fundamental Philosophy from Krug" (Hudson, Ohio, 1848); " The Art of Rhetoric" (Hudson, 1850; revised under the name of the "Art of Discourse," New York, 1867): " Rhetorical Praxis" (Cincinnati, 1860); " The Art of Bookkeeping" (1861); "The Logic of Sir William Hamilton" (1863); " Elements of Logic" (New York, 1867); " The Art of Composition" (1867); "The American Speller" (1869); " Introduction to the Study of English Literature" (1869); "The Young Composer" (1870); "Logical Praxis" (New Haven, 1872); "The Science of =+Esthetics" (1872); " The Elements of Psychology" (New York, 1876); "The Science of Ethics " (1876); "Outlines of Ontological Science, or a Philosophy of Knowledge and of Being" (1878); "The Science of Thought" (1886); and "The Elements of Mental Science" (1886). He has received the degree of D. D. from Farmer's College, Cincinnati, and that of LL. D. From Ingham University of New York, and also from the State University of Iowa.

Another son, Thomas Day, jurist, born in New Preston, Connecticut, 6 July 1777; died in Hartford, 1 March 1855, was graduated at Yale in 1797, studied law at Litchfield, and from September 1798, till September 1799, was a tutor in Williams College. He was admitted to the bar in December 1799, and began practice in Hartford. In 1809 he was appointed assistant secretary of the state of Connecticut, and in 1810 secretary, an office which he retained until 1835. In May 1815, he became associate judge of the County court of Hartford, acting in this capacity, with the exception of one year, till May 1825, when he was made chief judge of that court, and so continued until June. 1833. He was a judge of the City court of Hartford from 1818 till 1831, and one of the committee to prepare the statutes of 1808, and also of 1821 and 1824. He report, ed the decisions of the court of errors from 1805 till 1853, which were published in twenty volumes. He also edited several English law works, amounting altogether to forty volumes, in which he introduced notices of American decisions, and also of later English cases. He was an original member of the Connecticut historical society, of which he was president from 1839 until his death.

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