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Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889 and 1999. Virtualology.com warns that these 19th Century biographies contain errors and bias. We rely on volunteers to edit the historic biographies on a continual basis. If you would like to edit this biography please submit a rewritten biography in text form . If acceptable, the new biography will be published above the 19th Century Appleton's Cyclopedia Biography citing the volunteer editor





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Jeremiah Hallock

HALLOCK, Jeremiah, clergyman, born in Brook Haven, Suffolk County, New York, 13 March, 1758; died in West Simsbury, Connecticut, 23 June, 1826. His father removed to Goshen, Massachusetts, in 1766, and the son worked for him on a farm until he was of age. He afterward attended President Timothy Dwight's school at Northampton, Massachusetts, and in April, 1784, was ordained to the ministry. In October of the year following he was installed as pastor over the Congregational church at West Simsbury, where he remained until his death. During that period his church enjoyed no less than five distinct "revivals." Although not a college graduate, Mr. Hallock received the degree of A. M. from Yale in 1788. His biographer speaks of him as "a model Christian" and "a model pastor." See his life by Reverend Cyrus Hale (Hartford, 1838).--His brother, Moses, educator, born in Brook Haven, Suffolk County, N. Y., 16 February, 1760; died in Plainfield, Massachusetts, 17 July, 1837, after serving several months in the war of the Revolution and working on his father's farm, was graduated at Yale in 1788. He then studied theology, and was licensed to preach in August, 1790. In 17!)2 he was ordained pastor of the church in Plainfield, where he always remained. Finding his salary inadequate, he received students into his family, continuing to do so until 1824. (See illustration, page 51.) He had under his charge at various times 274 young men and 30 young women. Of the former, fifty became clergymen. One of his pupils was the poet Bryant, another was John Brown, of Osawatomie. See his life, by his son William (New York, 1854).--William Allen, editor, son of Moses, born in Plainfield, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, 2 June, 1794; died in New York city, 2 Get., 1880, was graduated at Williams in 1819, and at Andover theological seminary in 1822. During the latter year he became the agent of the New England tract society, and in 1825, when the latter was merged into the American tract society, he was made the corresponding secretary of the new organization. He filled this office until 1870, when he retired from its active duties. During this period he carefully examined every manuscript, tract, and book offered for publication, and revised for the press such as were accepted. He also edited " The American Messenger" for forty years, and "The Child's Paper" for twenty-five years. He received the degree of D. D. from Ratters in 18,50. Dr. Halleck wrote lives of Harlan Page (1835), Reverend Moses Halleck (1854), and Reverend Justin Edwards (1855). The first named attained to a circulation of 113,500 copies, and was translated into Swedish and German. He was also the author of several tracts, among them "The Mother's Last Prayer" (circulation, 380,000); "The Only Son" (370,000); and "The Mountain Miller" (260,000). These, with his books, were all published by the Tract society. See "Memorial of Reverend William A. Hallock, D. D.," by Mrs. H. C. Knight (New York, 1882).--Mary Angeline (La-THROP), author, second wife of William Allen, born in Rowe, Franklin County, Massachusetts, 18 June, 1810, was married to Dr. Hallock in 1868. She had been previously the wife of a Mr. Lathrop, and on the death of her first husband, in 1854, began to write as a means of support for her children. She published "That Sweet Story of Old" (New York, 1856); "Bethlehem and her Children" (1858); "Life of the Apostle Paul" (1860); "Life of Solomon" (1868); "Fall of Jerusalem" (1869); and "Life of Daniel" and "Beasts and Birds" (1870).--Gerard, journalist, another son of Moses, born in Plainfield, Massachusetts, 18 March, 1800; died in New Haven, Connecticut, 4 January, 1866, was graduated at Williams in 1819, and began his connection with the press in 1824 by the establishment of the "Boston Telegraph," a weekly, which the year following was merged into the "Boston Recorder." In 1827 he became part owner of the "New York Observer," and in 1828 was associated with David Hale in the publication of the "Journal of Commerce." In 1828 the partners fitted out a schooner to cruise off Sandy Hook and intercept European vessels, and in 1833 they ran an express from Philadelphia to New York, with eight relays of horses, and thus were enabled to publish the proceedings of congress a day in advance of their contemporaries. When other journals imitated their enterprise, they extended their relays to Washington. This system of news collection resulted in the establishment of the celebrated Halifax express. Mr. Hallock was an unflinching supporter of a national pro-slavery policy, yet he was generous in his treatment of individual slaves who made appeals to his charity. He purchased and liberated not less than one hundred of these, and provided for their transportation to Liberia: He contributed largely to the support of the religious denomination to which he belonged, and spent about $119,000 in the erection and maintenance for fourteen years of a church in New Haven. He was a founder of the Southern aid society, designed to take the place of the American home missionary society in the south, when the tatter withdrew its support from slave-holding churches. Mr. Hallock was a thorough classical scholar, and early in life gave lessons in Hebrew to clergymen. In August, 1861, the "Journal of Commerce," with four other papers, was presented by the grand jury of the United States circuit court for "encouraging rebels now in arms against the Federal government, by expressing sympathy and agreement with them, the duty of acceding to their demands, and dissatisfaction with the employment of force to overcome them." This was followed by the promulgation of an order from the post office department at Washington forbidding the use of the mails by the in-dieted papers. These measures resulted in the retirement of Mr. Hallock from journalism. He sold his interest in his paper, and thenceforth refrained from contributing a line to the public press. This abrupt change of all his habits of life, action, and thought brought with it the seeds of disease, and he only survived the loss of his cherished occupation a little more than four years. See "Life of Gerard Hallock" (New York, 1869).

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