Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum
   You are in: Museum of History >> Hall of North and South Americans >> Joel Barlow





American’s Four United Republics: Discovery-Based Curriculum

For more information go to Historic.us

 

Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889 and 1999. Virtualology.com warns that these 19th Century biographies contain errors and bias. We rely on volunteers to edit the historic biographies on a continual basis. If you would like to edit this biography please submit a rewritten biography in text form . If acceptable, the new biography will be published above the 19th Century Appleton's Cyclopedia Biography citing the volunteer editor





Virtual American Biographies

Over 30,000 personalities with thousands of 19th Century illustrations, signatures, and exceptional life stories. Virtualology.com welcomes editing and additions to the biographies. To become this site's editor or a contributor Click Here or e-mail Virtualology here.



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 





Click on an image to view full-sized

Joel Barlow

BARLOW, Joel, author, born in Redding, Connecticut, 24 March 1754; died near Cracow, Poland, 24 December 1812. He entered Dartmouth College in 1774, but soon removed to Yale, where he was graduated in 1778, delivering the commencement poem, "Prospect of Peace" (published in "American Poems," Litchfield, Connecticut," 1793). In 1780 he became chaplain of Poor's brigade of the Massachusetts line, having previously spent his vacations with the army, and fought at White Plains. On the disbandment of the army, in 1783,

Barlow settled at Hartford, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1786. He founded with Elisha Babcock the "American Mereury," a political and literary weekly, mid, joining the Hartford wits, wrote much satirical verse. In 1785 he edited and imposed the " Book of Psalmody" then in use in the Congregational Churches of Connecticut, contributing general versions of psalms never before attempted. Two years later he published at Hartford his epic poem, "The Vision of Columbus." which made him famous. As a result he was offered the agency of the Scioto Land Company, which, under cover of the Ohio Land Company, had purchased the right of redemption to nearly 3,500,000 acres of government land in Ohio, which it now desired to sell abroad. Barlow accepted, and sailed for France in May 1788. Not succeeding in his agency, he turned to polities and letters. As a Girondist he contributed largely to the political literature of France in 1789-'91. Becoming interested in English polities, he crossed over to England in 1791, and resided for nearly two years in London, one of a circle of artists, poets, wits. journalists, and pamphleteers who formed the Constitutional society, and were intensely republican in tone. West, Copley, Trumbull, Hayley, Home Tooke, and Priestley were among his associates. In London he published several political works, the most important being his "Advice to the Privileged Orders," which Burke attacked and Fox openly eulogized in parliament, and which the British government proscribed. Taking refuge in France, Barlow in 1792-'3 accompanied a deputation of the national convention into Savoy for the purpose of erecting it into the 84th department of France, and was there nominated for deputy, but was defeated. In Chainbery, in this province, he wrote his "Hasty Pudding," his most popular poem. Returning to Paris, Barlow forswore politics and devoted himself to advancing his private fortunes, and by mercantile pursuits and speculations soon became wealthy. He was appointed United States consul at Algiers in 1795, and spent a year and a half at the capital battling with the plague and the caprices of the day, and succeeded in effecting the object of his mission, the liberation of American captives and the signing of a treaty. Returning to Paris, he lived for eight years the life of a man of letters, writing his poem "The Columbiad," mid making extensive preparations for a history of the American revolution and one work on the French revolution. During this period, too, he exerted himself to heal the rupture between the United States and France caused by the mutual jealousy and suspicion of the federal party and the French directory. In the heated political campaign of 1799-1800, in America, he addressed to his countrymen two forcible and dignified epistles on the measures of the party in power, which had their due effect in determining the result. Returning to America in 1805, he established himself at Kalorama, near Washington, and, declining all political honors, devoted himself to literary and pastoral pursuits and the society of eminent men. In 1807 his epic, "The Columbiad"*the "Vision of Columbus" enlarged*was issued at Philadelphia. Of this book an impartial critic has said: "It abounds in beautiful passages, but is overburdened with political and philosophical disquisitions, and disfigured by singularities of expression." In 1811, his country being apparently on the verge of war with France, Barlow was prevailed on to accept the post of minister to the French court in the hope of preserving peace, and went there in the United States frigate " Constitution," commanded by Captain Isaac Hull, accompanied by Mrs. Barlow and her sister, Miss Baldwin. After nine months of diplomacy he was invited by Napoleon, then absent on his Russian campaign, to meet trim at Wilna, Poland, where the treaty, whose provisions had been agreed on, would be signed. Barlow set out, but on reaching Wilna found the French army in full retreat on the town from Moscow. Becoming involved in the retreat, he was overcome by cold and privation, and died at Yarmisica, in Poland. See "Life and Letters of Joel Barlow," by Charles Burr Todd (New York, 1886).

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

Start your search on Joel Barlow.


 

 


 


Unauthorized Site: This site and its contents are not affiliated, connected, associated with or authorized by the individual, family, friends, or trademarked entities utilizing any part or the subject's entire name. Any official or affiliated sites that are related to this subject will be hyper linked below upon submission and Evisum, Inc. review.

Copyright© 2000 by Evisum Inc.TM. All rights reserved.
Evisum Inc.TM Privacy Policy

Search:

About Us

 

 

Image Use

Please join us in our mission to incorporate America's Four United Republics discovery-based curriculum into the classroom of every primary and secondary school in the United States of America by July 2, 2026, the nation’s 250th birthday. , the United States of America: We The People Click Here

 

Childhood & Family

Click Here

 

Historic Documents

Articles of Association

Articles of Confederation 1775

Articles of Confederation

Article the First

Coin Act

Declaration of Independence

Declaration of Independence

Emancipation Proclamation

Gettysburg Address

Monroe Doctrine

Northwest Ordinance

No Taxation Without Representation

Thanksgiving Proclamations

Mayflower Compact

Treaty of Paris 1763

Treaty of Paris 1783

Treaty of Versailles

United Nations Charter

United States In Congress Assembled

US Bill of Rights

United States Constitution

US Continental Congress

US Constitution of 1777

US Constitution of 1787

Virginia Declaration of Rights

 

Historic Events

Battle of New Orleans

Battle of Yorktown

Cabinet Room

Civil Rights Movement

Federalist Papers

Fort Duquesne

Fort Necessity

Fort Pitt

French and Indian War

Jumonville Glen

Manhattan Project

Stamp Act Congress

Underground Railroad

US Hospitality

US Presidency

Vietnam War

War of 1812

West Virginia Statehood

Woman Suffrage

World War I

World War II

 

Is it Real?



Declaration of
Independence

Digital Authentication
Click Here

 

America’s Four Republics
The More or Less United States

 
Continental Congress
U.C. Presidents

Peyton Randolph

Henry Middleton

Peyton Randolph

John Hancock

  

Continental Congress
U.S. Presidents

John Hancock

Henry Laurens

John Jay

Samuel Huntington

  

Constitution of 1777
U.S. Presidents

Samuel Huntington

Samuel Johnston
Elected but declined the office

Thomas McKean

John Hanson

Elias Boudinot

Thomas Mifflin

Richard Henry Lee

John Hancock
[
Chairman David Ramsay]

Nathaniel Gorham

Arthur St. Clair

Cyrus Griffin

  

Constitution of 1787
U.S. Presidents

George Washington 

John Adams
Federalist Party


Thomas Jefferson
Republican* Party

James Madison 
Republican* Party

James Monroe
Republican* Party

John Quincy Adams
Republican* Party
Whig Party

Andrew Jackson
Republican* Party
Democratic Party


Martin Van Buren
Democratic Party

William H. Harrison
Whig Party

John Tyler
Whig Party

James K. Polk
Democratic Party

David Atchison**
Democratic Party

Zachary Taylor
Whig Party

Millard Fillmore
Whig Party

Franklin Pierce
Democratic Party

James Buchanan
Democratic Party


Abraham Lincoln 
Republican Party

Jefferson Davis***
Democratic Party

Andrew Johnson
Republican Party

Ulysses S. Grant 
Republican Party

Rutherford B. Hayes
Republican Party

James A. Garfield
Republican Party

Chester Arthur 
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland
Democratic Party

Benjamin Harrison
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland 
Democratic Party

William McKinley
Republican Party

Theodore Roosevelt
Republican Party

William H. Taft 
Republican Party

Woodrow Wilson
Democratic Party

Warren G. Harding 
Republican Party

Calvin Coolidge
Republican Party

Herbert C. Hoover
Republican Party

Franklin D. Roosevelt
Democratic Party

Harry S. Truman
Democratic Party

Dwight D. Eisenhower
Republican Party

John F. Kennedy
Democratic Party

Lyndon B. Johnson 
Democratic Party 

Richard M. Nixon 
Republican Party

Gerald R. Ford 
Republican Party

James Earl Carter, Jr. 
Democratic Party

Ronald Wilson Reagan 
Republican Party

George H. W. Bush
Republican Party 

William Jefferson Clinton
Democratic Party

George W. Bush 
Republican Party

Barack H. Obama
Democratic Party

Please Visit

Forgotten Founders
Norwich, CT

Annapolis Continental
Congress Society


U.S. Presidency
& Hospitality

© Stan Klos

 

 

 

 


Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum