Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum
   You are in: Museum of History >> Hall of North and South Americans >> Jonathan Roberts





American’s Four United Republics: Discovery-Based Curriculum

For more information go to Historic.us

 

Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889 and 1999. Virtualology.com warns that these 19th Century biographies contain errors and bias. We rely on volunteers to edit the historic biographies on a continual basis. If you would like to edit this biography please submit a rewritten biography in text form . If acceptable, the new biography will be published above the 19th Century Appleton's Cyclopedia Biography citing the volunteer editor





Virtual American Biographies

Over 30,000 personalities with thousands of 19th Century illustrations, signatures, and exceptional life stories. Virtualology.com welcomes editing and additions to the biographies. To become this site's editor or a contributor Click Here or e-mail Virtualology here.



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 



Jonathan Roberts

ROBERTS, Jonathan, senator, born in Upper Merion, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, 16 August, 1771; died in Philadelphia, 21 July, 1854. His father, of the same name, served many years in the assembly, and was one of the delegates to the convention that ratified the constitution of 1787. The son developed unusual literary taste, but, on the completion of his education in his seventeenth year, was apprenticed to a wheelwright. On attaining his majority he returned home and assisted his father in the work of the farm, devoting his leisure time to study. In 1798-'9 he was chosen to the assembly, and in 1807 to the state senate. He was then elected to congress, serving from 4 November, 1811, till 28 February, 1814, and attaining note, particularly in his support, of measures relating to the war of 1812. Pending the consideration of a declaration of war he made an able speech, closing with the words: " I repose safely on the maxim, 'Never to despair of the republic.'" Mr. Roberts had the entire confidence of Mr. Madison, who availed himself of his services in many important emergencies. During this period he wrote largely for public journals, many of his letters appearing in the "Aurora," his writings, notably a series of letters addressed to John Randolph, of Roanoke, attracting general public attention. When, in May, 1812, the president informed congress that there was no hope that Great Britain would abandon her aggressions, and an effort was made to adjourn congress, it was largely due to Mr. Roberts that an adjournment was prevented, and his call for the previous question forced the vote on the war bill, 18 June, 1812. He urged a vigorous prosecution of the war, was a member of the committee of ways and means, and came to be regarded as the representative of Albert Gallatin, secretary of the treasury, on the floor of the house. While serving his second term he was chosen to the senate, and entered on his duties, 28 February, 1814. In the senate tie became notable for the part that he took in the famous controversy growing out of the bill to admit Maine, into the Union. When the bill was reported with an amendment admitting Missouri also, Mr. Roberts moved the further amendment that slavery should be prohibited in the latter state. The debate on this motion, which lasted through three weeks, is historic. On its defeat came that of Mr. Thomas, of Illinois, known as the "Missouri compromise," which Mr. Roberts ably and determinedly opposed. After completing a full term of service in the senate, he was chosen again to the state assembly, and he was subsequently appointed by the governor one of the canal commissioners. For twenty years he took a chief part, in Pennsylvania in the opposition to Andrew Jackson, both before and after the latter became president. Mr. Roberts was an early and an active supporter of the protective tariff. In this interest he was a member of the national conventions that met at Harrisburg in 1827 and at New York in 1830. He was a delegate in 1840 to the convention that nominated General Harrison for the presidency, giving his support to Henry Clay, and on behalf of the Pennsylvania delegation he nominated John Tyler for the vice-presidency. When, on the death of Harrison, Tyler succeeded to the presidency, he appointed Mr. Roberts collector of the port of Philadelphia, which post he filled from April, 1841, till the following year. In the contest that arose between Mr. Tyler and the Whig party, the president asked Roberts to remove about thirty officials in tire customs department and to replace them with partisaus of the president. This Mr. Roberts refused to do, nor would he resign. Mr. Roberts had been a member of the Society of Friends, but, was disowned by them because of the part he had taken in furthering the war of 1812. --His son, Jonathan Manning, investigator, born in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, 7 December, 1821; died in Burlington, New Jersey, 28 February, 1888, studied law, was admitted to the bar at Norristown, Pennsylvania, in 1850, and practised his profession for about a year, but abandoned it and engaged in commercial pursuits. These proving financially successful, he found time to gratify his desire for metaphysical investigations. He also took an interest in politics, being an enthusiastic Whig and strongly opposed to slavery. He was a delegate to the Free-soil convention at Buffalo, New York, that nominated Martin Van Buren for president in 1848, and subsequently canvassed New Jersey for that candidate. When the so-called spiritual manifestations at Rochester, New York, first attracted public attention, Mr. Roberts earnestly protested against the possibility of their having a supernatural origin. After several years of patient inquiry he came to the conclusion that they were facts that could be explained on scientific principles and resulted from the operation of natural causes. This conviction led to his establishing an organ of the new faith at Philadelphia in 1878 under the title of "Mind and Matter." His fearless advocacy of his peculiar views involved him in litigation and caused his imprisonment. Finding the publication of a journal too great a tax on his resources, he abandoned it, and devoted the rest of his life to study and authorship. Among his manuscript, of which he left a large amount, is "A Life of Apollonius of Tyana" and "A History of the Christian Religion," which tie completed just before his death.

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

Start your search on Jonathan Roberts.


 

 


 


Unauthorized Site: This site and its contents are not affiliated, connected, associated with or authorized by the individual, family, friends, or trademarked entities utilizing any part or the subject's entire name. Any official or affiliated sites that are related to this subject will be hyper linked below upon submission and Evisum, Inc. review.

Copyright© 2000 by Evisum Inc.TM. All rights reserved.
Evisum Inc.TM Privacy Policy

Search:

About Us

 

 

Image Use

Please join us in our mission to incorporate America's Four United Republics discovery-based curriculum into the classroom of every primary and secondary school in the United States of America by July 2, 2026, the nation’s 250th birthday. , the United States of America: We The People Click Here

 

Childhood & Family

Click Here

 

Historic Documents

Articles of Association

Articles of Confederation 1775

Articles of Confederation

Article the First

Coin Act

Declaration of Independence

Declaration of Independence

Emancipation Proclamation

Gettysburg Address

Monroe Doctrine

Northwest Ordinance

No Taxation Without Representation

Thanksgiving Proclamations

Mayflower Compact

Treaty of Paris 1763

Treaty of Paris 1783

Treaty of Versailles

United Nations Charter

United States In Congress Assembled

US Bill of Rights

United States Constitution

US Continental Congress

US Constitution of 1777

US Constitution of 1787

Virginia Declaration of Rights

 

Historic Events

Battle of New Orleans

Battle of Yorktown

Cabinet Room

Civil Rights Movement

Federalist Papers

Fort Duquesne

Fort Necessity

Fort Pitt

French and Indian War

Jumonville Glen

Manhattan Project

Stamp Act Congress

Underground Railroad

US Hospitality

US Presidency

Vietnam War

War of 1812

West Virginia Statehood

Woman Suffrage

World War I

World War II

 

Is it Real?



Declaration of
Independence

Digital Authentication
Click Here

 

America’s Four Republics
The More or Less United States

 
Continental Congress
U.C. Presidents

Peyton Randolph

Henry Middleton

Peyton Randolph

John Hancock

  

Continental Congress
U.S. Presidents

John Hancock

Henry Laurens

John Jay

Samuel Huntington

  

Constitution of 1777
U.S. Presidents

Samuel Huntington

Samuel Johnston
Elected but declined the office

Thomas McKean

John Hanson

Elias Boudinot

Thomas Mifflin

Richard Henry Lee

John Hancock
[
Chairman David Ramsay]

Nathaniel Gorham

Arthur St. Clair

Cyrus Griffin

  

Constitution of 1787
U.S. Presidents

George Washington 

John Adams
Federalist Party


Thomas Jefferson
Republican* Party

James Madison 
Republican* Party

James Monroe
Republican* Party

John Quincy Adams
Republican* Party
Whig Party

Andrew Jackson
Republican* Party
Democratic Party


Martin Van Buren
Democratic Party

William H. Harrison
Whig Party

John Tyler
Whig Party

James K. Polk
Democratic Party

David Atchison**
Democratic Party

Zachary Taylor
Whig Party

Millard Fillmore
Whig Party

Franklin Pierce
Democratic Party

James Buchanan
Democratic Party


Abraham Lincoln 
Republican Party

Jefferson Davis***
Democratic Party

Andrew Johnson
Republican Party

Ulysses S. Grant 
Republican Party

Rutherford B. Hayes
Republican Party

James A. Garfield
Republican Party

Chester Arthur 
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland
Democratic Party

Benjamin Harrison
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland 
Democratic Party

William McKinley
Republican Party

Theodore Roosevelt
Republican Party

William H. Taft 
Republican Party

Woodrow Wilson
Democratic Party

Warren G. Harding 
Republican Party

Calvin Coolidge
Republican Party

Herbert C. Hoover
Republican Party

Franklin D. Roosevelt
Democratic Party

Harry S. Truman
Democratic Party

Dwight D. Eisenhower
Republican Party

John F. Kennedy
Democratic Party

Lyndon B. Johnson 
Democratic Party 

Richard M. Nixon 
Republican Party

Gerald R. Ford 
Republican Party

James Earl Carter, Jr. 
Democratic Party

Ronald Wilson Reagan 
Republican Party

George H. W. Bush
Republican Party 

William Jefferson Clinton
Democratic Party

George W. Bush 
Republican Party

Barack H. Obama
Democratic Party

Please Visit

Forgotten Founders
Norwich, CT

Annapolis Continental
Congress Society


U.S. Presidency
& Hospitality

© Stan Klos

 

 

 

 


Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum