Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum
   You are in: Museum of History >> Hall of North and South Americans >> Lowell Mason

Dad, why are you a Republican?

Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889 and 1999. Virtualology.com warns that these 19th Century biographies contain errors and bias. We rely on volunteers to edit the historic biographies on a continual basis. If you would like to edit this biography please submit a rewritten biography in text form . If acceptable, the new biography will be published above the 19th Century Appleton's Cyclopedia Biography citing the volunteer editor

 



Virtual American Biographies

Over 30,000 personalities with thousands of 19th Century illustrations, signatures, and exceptional life stories. Virtualology.com welcomes editing and additions to the biographies. To become this site's editor or a contributor Click Here or e-mail Virtualology here.



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 





Click on an image to view full-sized

Lowell Mason

MASON, Lowell, musician, born in Medfield, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, 8 January, 1792; died in Orange, New Jersey, 11 August, . 1872. His father was a mechanic in a small New England village, and his early opportunities for education were meagre; but he had from childhood a passion for music, and before he was twenty years of age had learned to play on every kind of musical instrument that had come within his reach. He was also so proficient in vocal music that at sixteen he was leader of t, he village choir, and a teacher of singing-classes. At twenty he went to Savannah, where he continued to practise, lead, and teach. While residing there he arranged, with some assistance, a collection of psalm tunes, that was based on Gardiner's "Sacred Melodies," which latter was compiled from the works of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven, adding to them tunes of his own composition. This was published by the Handel and Haydn society in 1821 as the "Boston Handel and Haydn Society's Collection of Church Music," the compiler's name being almost entirely suppressed. The book was a decided success and led to Mason's removal to Boston in 1827, and his taking "general charge of music in the churches there." He now began the instruction of classes in vocal music, devoting special attention to the training of children to the performance of the alto part in chorals, and to the introduction of vocal music into the public schools In 1829, his attention being called to the Pestalozzian method of teaching music, and especially to the various improvements upon it, Mr. Mason adopted it after careful and protracted examination. Juvenile classes were established and taught gratuitously by him for many years, but he was soon compelled, by the extent of his labors, to take an assistant. Under his influence vocal music received a new and extraordinary impulse in Boston and throughout New England. Eminent teachers were introduced into private --- schools" the Boston academy of music was established by him in 1832; music was prescribed as a regular branch of instruction in the public schools of Boston and subsequently very generally throughout the entire country; permanent musical classes, lectures on music, concerts, schools for instrumental music, and teachers' institutes, were also widely established. In 1837 he visited Europe and made himself acquainted with all the improvements in music-teaching in the continental cities. On his return he published the results of his journey in "Musical Letters from Abroad" (New York, 1853). In 1855 Mr. Mason received from the University of the city of New York the degree of doctor of music, the first instance of the conferring of that degree by an American university. The growing taste for music that he had inspired incited him to prepare about this time numerous text-books for juvenile classes, glee-books, and collections of church music. During his later years he labored diligently to promote the introduction of strictly congregational singing into the churches, and to this end he devoted much time to the preparation, in connection with Edwards A. Park and Austin Phelps, of "The Sabbath Hymn and Tune-Book" (New York, 1859), which attained instant popularity. The last years of his life were passed with his sons at Orange, New Jersey, and his devotion to musical study and composition continued to the end. Here he had brought together one of the most extensive and valuable musical libraries in the United States, which, after his death, his family presented to Yale college. "Dr. Mason," says Reverend Octavius B. Frothingham, "did more to make the practice of vocal music popular than to raise the standard of musical culture, and long before his death the influence of his school had yielded to the power of more finished art. Still, his work was of great value in its time." His published works exceed fifty volumes, and many of them have had an immense sale. The aggregate circulation of the collections of church music somewhat exceeded two million copies, and several of the juvenile collections have sold very largely. The following are some of his principal books, in compiling which he had no assistance and which contain many of his own compositions: "Juvenile Psalmist" (Boston, 1829) ; "Juvenile Lyre," the first book of school songs published in the United States (1830); "The Choir, or Union Collection " (1832); "Manual of Instruction in Vocal Music" (1834) ; "The Boston Academy Collection" (1835) ; " Lyra Sacra" ; " Occasional Psalmody" (1837) ; "Songs of Asaph" ; " The Seraph" (1838); " The Modern Psalmist" (1839); "Carmina Sacra," of which and its two revisions, the "New Carmina Sacra "and the " American Tune-Book," more than six hundred thousand copies had been sold at the time of Dr. Mason's death (1841); "The Gentleman's Glee-Book" (1842); "American Sabbath-School Singing-Book" (Philadelphia, 1843) ; "Boston Academy Collection of Choruses" (Boston, 1844) ; "Song-Book of the School-Room" (1845) ; "Primary-School Song-Book" (1846) ; "The National Psalmist" (1848) ; " The HandBook of Psalmody" (London, 1852); " The Hallelujah" (New York, 1854); " The Normal Singer" (1856); and " Mammoth Musical Exercises" (1857).--His son, William, pianist, born in Boston, Massachusetts, 24 January, 1829, made his first public appearance as a pianist at a symphony concert in Boston, 7 March, 1846. He appeared frequently in concerts until the spring of 1849, when he went to Leipsie, Germany, and studied the piano-forte under Moscheles, harmony under Moritz Hauptmann, and instrumentation under E. F. Richter. Later he was instructed by Alexander Dreyschock in Prague, and finally by Liszt, at Weimar, in 1853-'4. He played in public in Prague, Frankfort, and Weimar, and in 1853 made a brief visit to London. He returned to this country in July, 1854, and shortly after his arrival made a concert tour, playing at each representation through a programme of eight or ten piano-forte pieces, illustrating different styles. It is believed that these were the first concerts of the kind consisting of piano-forte playing solely, without other attraction, that were given either in this country or abroad. On his return he settled in New York, where he has since mainly occupied himself in teaching, playing in public occasionally. In the winter of 1855-'6 he established, in connection with Carl Bergmann and Theodore Thomas, a series of classical soirees, at which the instrumental works of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, and others were performed. These concerts became known as the Mason and Thomas soirees of chamber music, and were continued without interruption until 1868. Mr. Mason, in connection with Eli S. Hoadly, is the author of two piano-forte methods (Boston, 1867-'71), and also of a system of "Piano-forte Technics" (1878), in which latter work William S. B. Mathews was connected with him as associate editor. He has also published about forty compositions for the piano-forte, a few of which are adapted for concert purposes, but consisting chiefly of smaller "pieces de salon," such as scherzos, ballades, romanzas, nocturnes, caprices, reveries, etc. Most of these have been republished in Europe. In 1872 Mr. Mason received from Yale the degree of doctor of music.

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

Start your search on Lowell Mason.


 

 

 



Unauthorized Site: This site and its contents are not affiliated, connected, associated with or authorized by the individual, family, friends, or trademarked entities utilizing any part or the subject's entire name. Any official or affiliated sites that are related to this subject will be hyper linked below upon submission and Evisum, Inc. review.

Copyright© 2000 by Evisum Inc.TM. All rights reserved.
Evisum Inc.TM Privacy Policy

Search:

About Us

 

Contact Us 

 
Historic Document Exhibits

 

Image Use

 

In this powerful, historic work, Stan Klos unfolds the complex 15-year U.S. Founding period revealing, for the first time, four distinctly different United American Republics.  This is history on a splendid scale -- a book about the not quite unified American Colonies and States that would eventually form a fourth republic, with only 11 states, the United States of America: We The People Click Here

 

Historic Documents

Articles of Association

Articles of Confederation 1775

Articles of Confederation

Article the First

Coin Act

Declaration of Independence

Declaration of Independence

Emancipation Proclamation

Gettysburg Address

Monroe Doctrine

Northwest Ordinance

No Taxation Without Representation

Thanksgiving Proclamations

Mayflower Compact

Treaty of Paris 1763

Treaty of Paris 1783

Treaty of Versailles

United Nations Charter

United States In Congress Assembled

US Bill of Rights

United States Constitution

US Continental Congress

US Constitution of 1777

US Constitution of 1787

Virginia Declaration of Rights

 

Historic Events

Battle of New Orleans

Battle of Yorktown

Cabinet Room

Civil Rights Movement

Federalist Papers

Fort Duquesne

Fort Necessity

Fort Pitt

French and Indian War

Jumonville Glen

Manhattan Project

Stamp Act Congress

Underground Railroad

US Hospitality

US Presidency

Vietnam War

War of 1812

West Virginia Statehood

Woman Suffrage

World War I

World War II

 

Is it Real?



Declaration of
Independence

Digital Authentication
Click Here

 

America’s Four Republics
The More or Less United States

 
Continental Congress
U.C. Presidents

Peyton Randolph

Henry Middleton

Peyton Randolph

John Hancock

  

Continental Congress
U.S. Presidents

John Hancock

Henry Laurens

John Jay

Samuel Huntington

  

Constitution of 1777
U.S. Presidents

Samuel Huntington

Samuel Johnston
Elected but declined the office

Thomas McKean

John Hanson

Elias Boudinot

Thomas Mifflin

Richard Henry Lee

John Hancock
[
Chairman David Ramsay]

Nathaniel Gorham

Arthur St. Clair

Cyrus Griffin

  

Constitution of 1787
U.S. Presidents

George Washington 

John Adams
Federalist Party


Thomas Jefferson
Republican* Party

James Madison 
Republican* Party

James Monroe
Republican* Party

John Quincy Adams
Republican* Party
Whig Party

Andrew Jackson
Republican* Party
Democratic Party


Martin Van Buren
Democratic Party

William H. Harrison
Whig Party

John Tyler
Whig Party

James K. Polk
Democratic Party

David Atchison**
Democratic Party

Zachary Taylor
Whig Party

Millard Fillmore
Whig Party

Franklin Pierce
Democratic Party

James Buchanan
Democratic Party


Abraham Lincoln 
Republican Party

Jefferson Davis***
Democratic Party

Andrew Johnson
Republican Party

Ulysses S. Grant 
Republican Party

Rutherford B. Hayes
Republican Party

James A. Garfield
Republican Party

Chester Arthur 
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland
Democratic Party

Benjamin Harrison
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland 
Democratic Party

William McKinley
Republican Party

Theodore Roosevelt
Republican Party

William H. Taft 
Republican Party

Woodrow Wilson
Democratic Party

Warren G. Harding 
Republican Party

Calvin Coolidge
Republican Party

Herbert C. Hoover
Republican Party

Franklin D. Roosevelt
Democratic Party

Harry S. Truman
Democratic Party

Dwight D. Eisenhower
Republican Party

John F. Kennedy
Democratic Party

Lyndon B. Johnson 
Democratic Party 

Richard M. Nixon 
Republican Party

Gerald R. Ford 
Republican Party

James Earl Carter, Jr. 
Democratic Party

Ronald Wilson Reagan 
Republican Party

George H. W. Bush
Republican Party 

William Jefferson Clinton
Democratic Party

George W. Bush 
Republican Party

Barack H. Obama
Democratic Party

Please Visit

Forgotten Founders
Norwich, CT

Annapolis Continental
Congress Society


U.S. Presidency
& Hospitality

© Stan Klos

 

 

 

 


Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum