Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum
   You are in: Museum of History >> Hall of North and South Americans >> Richard Peters





American’s Four United Republics: Discovery-Based Curriculum

For more information go to Historic.us

 

Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889 and 1999. Virtualology.com warns that these 19th Century biographies contain errors and bias. We rely on volunteers to edit the historic biographies on a continual basis. If you would like to edit this biography please submit a rewritten biography in text form . If acceptable, the new biography will be published above the 19th Century Appleton's Cyclopedia Biography citing the volunteer editor





Virtual American Biographies

Over 30,000 personalities with thousands of 19th Century illustrations, signatures, and exceptional life stories. Virtualology.com welcomes editing and additions to the biographies. To become this site's editor or a contributor Click Here or e-mail Virtualology here.



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 



Richard Peters

PETERS, Richard, clergyman, born in Liverpool, England, in 1704; died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 10 July, 1776. His father, Ralph, was town-clerk of Liverpool. The son was educated at Westminster school, and at Oxford and Leyden, and after studying law took orders in theChureh of England in 1730-'1, and came to this country on account of domestic troubles about 1735. He was employed for some time in Christ church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as assistant minister, but, having resigned in 1737, he became secretary to the land office, was secretary to a succession of governors, and was one of the provincial council until his death, in the summer of 1762 he was invited to officiate in the United churches of Philadelphia, and was chosen to be rector at the close of the year. He made a visit to England in 1764, for the benefit of his health chiefly, and returned to Philadelphia at the close of 1765. He received the degree of D.D. from the University of Oxford in 1770. Conscious of the infirmities of age, he resigned his rectorship in September, 1775. He was one of those that, with Benjamin Franklin, founded the Public academy, out of which grew the College of Philadelphia. He was one of the original trustees of the latter, president of the board in 1756-'64, an incorporator of the Philadelphia library, and one of the original managers of the Pennsylvania hospital. Bishop White speaks of Dr. Peters "with respect and affection," he haying been one of the assistant ministers in the United churches during the latter years of Dr. Peters's rectorship. Bishop White says that he had adopted the fantastical notions of Jacob Bochman, the German cobbler, in regard to the "inward light" and kindred topics, and he was a public opponent of George Whitefield during the latter's evangelistic journey through the country. He published "The Two Last Sermons preached at Christ Church," printed by Franklin (Philadelphia, 1737); and other discourses.--His nephew, Richard, jurist, born at his father's seat of Belmont, Philadelphia, 22 June, 1744; died there, 22 August, 1828, was a son of William Peters, who was for many years register of the admiralty, and a judge of the courts of common pleas, quarter sessions, and orphans' court. The son was graduated in 1761 at the College of Philadelphia (now University of Pennsylvania), from which he received the degree of LL.D. in 1827, and of which he was a trustee in 1788-'91. He studied law, came to the bar in 1763, and soon rose to eminence in his profession. In 1771 he became register of the admiralty, retaining this post until the war for independence was begun. When most of the leaders of the Philadelphia bar went over to the side of the king in the early days of the Revolution, he remained true to the cause of the colonies. He commanded a company of provincial troops in 1775, on 13 June, 1776, was elected by congress secretary of the Continental board of war, and later was also a commissioner of war, in which post he rendered important services to the patriot cause. Peters discovered that Benedict Arnold was applying to his own use funds that had been placed in his hands for the purchase of the clothing and subsistence for the army, and an attempt on Peters's part to stop this robbery produced between him and Arnold an open quarrel. In a letter to a friend he wrote: "I did not conceal, but wrote to headquarters my want of confidence in Arnold. When his traitorous conduct at West Point became public, neither Colonel Pickering nor myself were the least surprised." In 1780 Peters was one of those that subscribed £5,000 each to the Pennsylvania bank for the provisioning of the army. In December, 1781, when he resigned his post in the war office, congress voted him their "thanks for his long and faithful services." In 1782-'3 he was a member of the Continental congress; in 1787 he became a member of the assembly, and he was the speaker of this body in 1788-'90, in which capacity he and General Thomas Mifflin, the speaker of the senate, were the representatives of Pennsylvania that met General Washington as he entered the state on his way to New York to be inaugurated as first president of the United States. In 1791 he was the speaker of the state senate. On the formation of the Federal government he was tendered the comptrollership of the treasury, but declined it. On 11 April, 1792, he was commissioned judge of the United States district court for Pennsylvania, which office he held until his death. Judge Story wrote of him : "I have learned much in his school, and owe him many thanks for his rich contribution to the maritime jurisprudence of our country." One of Mr. Peters's important works was his active instrumentality in securing the act of succession for the ministers of the Protestant Episcopal church in the United States. In 1785 he went to England to obtain from the British prelates ordination to the office of bishop for three priests of the American church, and it was largely through his energy and endeavor that this end was accomplished. Judge Peters was a practical farmer, one of the founders of the Philadelphia agricultural society, and its first president, retaining the place till his death, a period of more than thirty years. The "Memoirs" of the society contain more than one hundred papers by him. Judge Peters had a high reputation as a wit, and was a great favorite in society. At both his city home and his country-seat, Belmont, he extended a princely hospitality, and he was visited by the most eminent men of his own country, and by distinguished foreigners. One of his most frequent guests was Gem Washington, with whom Judge Peters was on terms of the closest intimacy from 1776 till General Washington's death. The French traveller, Chastellux, designares Belmont as a "tasty little box in the most charming spot nature could embellish." This estate, containing more than 200 acres, is now included in Fairmount park, and during 1876 was the site of the Centennial exhibition buildings. He was instrumental in constructing the first permanent bridge over the Schuylkill river, serving as the first president of the bridge company. Judge Peters published "Admiralty Decisions of the District Court of the United States for the Pennsylvania Districts, 1780-1807" (Philadelphia, 1807). See "Address on the Death of Hon. Richard Peters," by Samuel Breck (Philadelphia, 1828).-The second Richard's son, Richard, lawyer, born at Belmont, Philadelphia, in August, 1780; died there, 2 May, 1848, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1800. He was the solicitor of Philadelphia county in 1822-'5, and was one of the founders of the Philadelphia saving fund society, the oldest institution of that kind in Pennsylvania, if not in this country. He succeeded Henry Wheaton as reporter of the United States supreme court, and published "Reports of the United States Circuit Court, 1803-'18" (Philadelphia, 1819); " Reports of the United States Supreme Court, 1828-'43" (17 vols., 1828-'43) ; "Condensed Reports of Cases in the United States Supreme Court from its Organization till 1827" (6 vols., 1835); and "Full and Arranged Digest of Cases determined in the Supreme, Circuit, and District Courts of the United States from the Organization of the Government" (3 vols., 1838-'9 ; new ed., 2 vols., 1848). He edited "Chitty on Bills of Exchange " (3 vols., 1819) and Bushrod Washington's "Circuit Court Reports" (4 vols., 1826-'9).

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

Start your search on Richard Peters.


 

 


 


Unauthorized Site: This site and its contents are not affiliated, connected, associated with or authorized by the individual, family, friends, or trademarked entities utilizing any part or the subject's entire name. Any official or affiliated sites that are related to this subject will be hyper linked below upon submission and Evisum, Inc. review.

Copyright© 2000 by Evisum Inc.TM. All rights reserved.
Evisum Inc.TM Privacy Policy

Search:

About Us

 

 

Image Use

Please join us in our mission to incorporate America's Four United Republics discovery-based curriculum into the classroom of every primary and secondary school in the United States of America by July 2, 2026, the nation’s 250th birthday. , the United States of America: We The People Click Here

 

Childhood & Family

Click Here

 

Historic Documents

Articles of Association

Articles of Confederation 1775

Articles of Confederation

Article the First

Coin Act

Declaration of Independence

Declaration of Independence

Emancipation Proclamation

Gettysburg Address

Monroe Doctrine

Northwest Ordinance

No Taxation Without Representation

Thanksgiving Proclamations

Mayflower Compact

Treaty of Paris 1763

Treaty of Paris 1783

Treaty of Versailles

United Nations Charter

United States In Congress Assembled

US Bill of Rights

United States Constitution

US Continental Congress

US Constitution of 1777

US Constitution of 1787

Virginia Declaration of Rights

 

Historic Events

Battle of New Orleans

Battle of Yorktown

Cabinet Room

Civil Rights Movement

Federalist Papers

Fort Duquesne

Fort Necessity

Fort Pitt

French and Indian War

Jumonville Glen

Manhattan Project

Stamp Act Congress

Underground Railroad

US Hospitality

US Presidency

Vietnam War

War of 1812

West Virginia Statehood

Woman Suffrage

World War I

World War II

 

Is it Real?



Declaration of
Independence

Digital Authentication
Click Here

 

America’s Four Republics
The More or Less United States

 
Continental Congress
U.C. Presidents

Peyton Randolph

Henry Middleton

Peyton Randolph

John Hancock

  

Continental Congress
U.S. Presidents

John Hancock

Henry Laurens

John Jay

Samuel Huntington

  

Constitution of 1777
U.S. Presidents

Samuel Huntington

Samuel Johnston
Elected but declined the office

Thomas McKean

John Hanson

Elias Boudinot

Thomas Mifflin

Richard Henry Lee

John Hancock
[
Chairman David Ramsay]

Nathaniel Gorham

Arthur St. Clair

Cyrus Griffin

  

Constitution of 1787
U.S. Presidents

George Washington 

John Adams
Federalist Party


Thomas Jefferson
Republican* Party

James Madison 
Republican* Party

James Monroe
Republican* Party

John Quincy Adams
Republican* Party
Whig Party

Andrew Jackson
Republican* Party
Democratic Party


Martin Van Buren
Democratic Party

William H. Harrison
Whig Party

John Tyler
Whig Party

James K. Polk
Democratic Party

David Atchison**
Democratic Party

Zachary Taylor
Whig Party

Millard Fillmore
Whig Party

Franklin Pierce
Democratic Party

James Buchanan
Democratic Party


Abraham Lincoln 
Republican Party

Jefferson Davis***
Democratic Party

Andrew Johnson
Republican Party

Ulysses S. Grant 
Republican Party

Rutherford B. Hayes
Republican Party

James A. Garfield
Republican Party

Chester Arthur 
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland
Democratic Party

Benjamin Harrison
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland 
Democratic Party

William McKinley
Republican Party

Theodore Roosevelt
Republican Party

William H. Taft 
Republican Party

Woodrow Wilson
Democratic Party

Warren G. Harding 
Republican Party

Calvin Coolidge
Republican Party

Herbert C. Hoover
Republican Party

Franklin D. Roosevelt
Democratic Party

Harry S. Truman
Democratic Party

Dwight D. Eisenhower
Republican Party

John F. Kennedy
Democratic Party

Lyndon B. Johnson 
Democratic Party 

Richard M. Nixon 
Republican Party

Gerald R. Ford 
Republican Party

James Earl Carter, Jr. 
Democratic Party

Ronald Wilson Reagan 
Republican Party

George H. W. Bush
Republican Party 

William Jefferson Clinton
Democratic Party

George W. Bush 
Republican Party

Barack H. Obama
Democratic Party

Please Visit

Forgotten Founders
Norwich, CT

Annapolis Continental
Congress Society


U.S. Presidency
& Hospitality

© Stan Klos

 

 

 

 


Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum