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Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889 and 1999. Virtualology.com warns that these 19th Century biographies contain errors and bias. We rely on volunteers to edit the historic biographies on a continual basis. If you would like to edit this biography please submit a rewritten biography in text form . If acceptable, the new biography will be published above the 19th Century Appleton's Cyclopedia Biography citing the volunteer editor





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Samuel McClellan

McCLELLAN, Samuel, soldier, born in Worcester, Massachusetts, 4 January, 1730" died in Woodstock, Connecticut, 17 October, 1807. His parents emigrated to America early in the 18th century and settled on a farm near Worcester. The family came from Kirkcudbright, on the Frith of Solway, Scotland, where in earlier times they had taken part in Scottish wars as stanch upholders of the cause of the Stuarts. Samuel was brought up as a farmer, but joined the army, and served as a lieutenant in the French and Indian war. The experience thus gained, and the example of the British officers with whom he served, proved of great advantage to him in the Revolutionary war. In 1773 a troop of horse was raised in Woodstock and neighboring towns, of which he was made captain. On the news of the battle of Lexington the company immediately marched to Boston. Subsequently he was commissioned major, lieutenant-colonel, and colonel of the 12th regiment of militia, and on 10 June, 1779, brigadier of the 5th brigade of militia. His commissions are preserved in the family residence at Woodstock, Connecticut, all signed by Governor John Trumbull. One reads by authority of George III., and another by authority of the Continental congress. After the invasion of New London and the massacre at Fort Groton he wax placed in charge of those posts, and continued in tha.t capacity until the close of the war. When only a major in the militia he was invited by General Washington to join the Continental army, with the promise of a colonelcy, but he declined. When peace was declared he returned to Woodstock and was several times elected to the state assembly.--His grandson, George, surgeon, born in Woodstock, Connecticut, 23 December, 1796" died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 9 May, 1847, was graduated at Yale in 1816. A fondness for natural science, developed under the influence of the elder Silliman, led him to adopt medicine as his profession, and he began his studies in New Haven under Dr. Thomas Hubbard, but was graduated at the medical department of theUniversity of Pennsylvania in 1819. Even before he obtained his degree he was elected resident physician to the hospital of the Philadelphia ahns-house. During his first year of practice he performed the most important operations in surgery, such as lithotomy, extraction of the lens for cataract, and extirpation of the lower jaw. He opened a dissecting-room, and gave private courses of lectures, both on anatomy and surgery, and his class soon became so nmnerous as to require a larger room for their accommodation. Itissuccess was so great that he conceived the idea of founding a medical college, and with others he obtained from the legislature of Pennsylvania, in 1825, a charter for Jefferson medical college. In 1826 he began his public lectures as professor of surgery in the new college, which, notwithstanding the opposition of the profession and difficulty in obtaining a faculty, grew so rapidly that in ten years the students numbered 360. In 1838 the faculty was reorganized, but without Dr. McClellan's name, and this action led to his immediately procuring the incorporation of the medical department of Pennsylvania college. His lectures in connection with the new institution began in November, 1839, and continued until the spring of 1843. He was the originator of the extended system of medical education as it now exists in this country, and the clinical instruction of the college was originated by him. He acquired one of the largest practices known in the United States, and his reputation extended to Europe, while lie attracted patients from all parts of this country, the West Indies, and South America. As a surgeon lie performed almost every capital operation known, together with many others that were original with himself. He was especially eminent in ophthalmic surgery and his operations for cataract and other diseases of the eye, and he was among the first to extract the lens. Other operations, now quite common, were not used in the United States till performed by him, and he shares with Valentine Mott, of New York, and Jonn C. Warren, of Boston, the credit of establishing many procedures new in this country. He did more than any other surgeon by the number and success of his operations to establish completely, as safe and feasible, the removM of the parotid gland. In earlier years he was a contributor of original papers to medical periodicals, and was one of the conductors of the " American Medical Review and Journal." Dr. McClellan edited Eberle's " Theory ***) , , and t ractice of Physic (Philadelphia, 1840), and left in manuscript " The Principles and Practice of Surgery," (1847). It has been said of him that, "like Bowditch, lie infused his spirit into his pupils There are now hundreds of them scattered over the country who manifest it in their bold and efficient surgery, and who will welcome the publication of these principles which they once heard from his eloquent lips, and on which their success in praerice has so nmch depended." See "Memoir" by his son in Gross's "Lives of Eminent Physicians and Surgeons" (Philadelphia, 1861).--His brother, Samuel, physician, born in Woodstock, Connecticut, 21 September, 1800; died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 4 January, 1853, was graduated at the medical department of Yale in 1823, and then entered the office of George McClellan in Philadelphia. After a few years he settled in Bristol, Pennsylvania but soon returned to Philadelphia, where lie renewed his association with his brother, particularly in ophthalmic surgery. He was likewise identified with the founding of Jefferson medical college, in which he was demonstrator and afterward professor of anatomy. This chair he relinquished to accept that of obstetrics. Subsequently he was elected professor of that branch in the medical department of Pennsylvania college, but soon resigned to follow his private practice, in which he continued until his death George's son, John Hill Brinton, physician, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 13 August, 1823; died in Edinburgh, Scotland, 20 July, 1874, was graduated at the University of Pennsylvania in 1841, and at its medical department in 1844. In 1855 he was elected professor of anatomy in the medical department of Pennsylvania college, but held that appointment for a short time only. He was surgeon at St. Joseph's hospital from 1850 till 1862, and also at Will's eye hospital for many years. During the civil war he was connected with the South street hospital, and afterward was acting assistant surgeon at Mower's hospital, where he performed some notable operations, accounts of which are given in "The Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion" (Washington, 1870). Dr. McClellan had an extensive practice, both in surgery and in medicine, and was frequently called on to operate in different parts of the state. Among the operations credited to him are the removal of the entire parotid gland, reported in his father's " Surgery," and the first and only removal of the entire upper extremity for disease, including the shoulder-blade and collar-bone, he inherited much of his father's quickness, and his diagnosis of disease seemed almost intuitive, while his extreme delicacy of feeling and genial nature made him a welcome visitor in the sick-room. Dr. McClellan edited " Principles and Practice of Surgery" (Philadelphia, 1848), left in manuscript by his father. His son GEORGE was graduated at the Jefferson medical college in 1870, and now practises in Philadelphia.--The second Samuel's son, Carswell, civil engineer, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 3 December, 1835, was graduated at Williams, Massachusetts, in 1855, and on 6 May, 1862, entered the 32d New York regiment, was wounded at Malvern Hill, and on 3 July became topographical assistant on the staff of General Andrew A. Humphreys, tte was present at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg where he was wounded again, and at the headquarters of the Army of the Potomac until April, 1864. He was taken prisoner in the fight for the Weldon railroad on 19 August, 1864, but was paroled, 16 November, 1864:, and resigned on that date. He was engineer in charge of location and construction works upon the St. Louis, Vandalia and Terra Itaute, Northern Pacific, St. Paul and Pacific, and other western railroads, from 1867 till 1881, when he became United States civil assistant engineer, which post he now (1887) holds. He is the author of the " Personal Memoirs and Military History of Ulysses S. Grant vs. the Record of the Army of the Potomac " (Boston, 1887). Carswell's brother, Henry BrMnerd, soldier, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 17 October, 1840, was graduated at Williams in 1858. In 1862-'3 he was adjutant of the 3d Virginia cavalry, and from 1863 till the end of the war served as assistant adjutant-general of the cavalry corps of the Army of Northern Virginia. He was chief of staff to Gens. James E. B. Stuart and Wade Hampton, and served by assignment on the staff of Gem Robert E. Lee from 14 May till 11 August, 1863. Since 1870 he has been principal of Sayre female institute, in Lexington, Kentucky He is the author of "Life and Campaigns of Major-General J. E. B. Stuart, Commander of the Cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia " (Boston, 1885).

--BEGIN-Alexander McClellanil

***McCLELANIL Alexander, clergyman, born in Schenectady, New York, in 1796; died in New Brunswick, New Jersey, 19 December, 1864. He was graduated at Union in 1809, and at the age of nineteen was licensed by the Associate Reformed presbytery of New York, and elected pastor of Rutgers street Presbyterian church, where he remained for seven years. He was professor of rhetoric, logic, and metaphysics in Dickinson college, Pennsylvania, in 1822-'9, of languages at Rutgers in 1829-'32 of oriental literature and hmguages there from 1833 till 1840, and of orientM languages and literature and biblical criticism in the theological seminary of the Reformed church from 1840 till 1851. After his resignation he travelled in Europe, and then resided in New Brunswick until his death. He received the degree of D. D. from Princeton in 1818, and from Union and Dickinson in 1830. His publications consist of occasional sermons, pamphlets, and " Manual of Sacred interpretation" (New York, 1842 ; 2d ed., entitled "Canon and Interpretation of Scripture," 1860). His sermons were edited, with a memoir, and published by Reverend Richard W. Dickinson (New York, 1867).

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