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Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889 and 1999. Virtualology.com warns that these 19th Century biographies contain errors and bias. We rely on volunteers to edit the historic biographies on a continual basis. If you would like to edit this biography please submit a rewritten biography in text form . If acceptable, the new biography will be published above the 19th Century Appleton's Cyclopedia Biography citing the volunteer editor



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Stephen Elliott

ELLIOTT, Stephen, naturalist, born in Beaufort, South Carolina, 11 November 1771; died in Charleston, South Carolina, 28 March 1830. His father settled in Beaufort, where he purchased land, and married a granddaughter of John Barnwell. He was graduated at Yale in 1791, devoted himself to the cultivation of his estate and to literary and scientific studies, and in 1793 was elected to the legislature of South Carolina, of which he continued to be a member until the establishment of the Bank of the state in 1812, of which he was chosen president. He retained this office till his death. His leisure was devoted to literature and science, and he cultivated the Study of botany with enthusiasm. In 1813 he was instrumental in founding the Literary and philosophical society of South Carolina, of which he was president. He lectured gratuitously on his favorite science, and was for some time editor of the "Southern Review." In 1825 he aided in establishing the Medical College of the state, and was elected professor of natural history and botany. He was the author of "The Botany of South Carolina and Georgia" (Charleston, 1821'4), in the preparation of which he was assisted by Dr. James McBride, and left several works in manuscript. His collection in natural history was one of the most extensive in the country.

His son Elliott, Stephen, P. E. bishop, born in Beaufort, South Carolina, 31 August 1806; died in Savannah, Georgia, 21 December 1866. He was graduated at Harvard in 1824, studied law, and practiced in Charleston and Beaufort from 1827 till 1833. Under the impulse of a newly awakened religious devotion, he became a candidate for holy orders in the Episcopal Church, and was ordained a deacon in 1835, and became professor of sacred literature and the evidences of Christianity in South Carolina College. He took priest's orders the following year. In 1840 he was chosen first bishop of the diocese of Georgia, and after his consecration, 28 February 1841, became rector of St. John's Church, Savannah. In 1844 he was made provisional bishop of Florida. From 1845 till 1853 he lived in Montpelier, Georgia, where he founded a seminary for young ladies, and expended his fortune in the effort to improve female education. He afterward officiated as rector of Christ Church, Savannah, until his death.

Stephen Elliott, son of the latter, soldier, born in Beaufort, South Carolina, in 1832; died in Aiken, South Carolina, 21 March 1866. At the beginning of the war he raised and equipped a battery of light artillery, known as the Beaufort artillery. At Pinckney Island, in August 1862, he commanded three batteries, and was promoted for his gallantry. Shortly afterward he was placed in command of Fort Sumter, where he continued during the long bombardment to which General Gillmore subjected it. In July 1864, he was wounded by the explosion of the mine at Petersburg, and was disabled for the rest of the war. He attained the grade of brigadier general. In 1865 he took the oath to support the constitution of the state and of the United States, and later was a candidate for congress, being opposed by ex-Gov. Aiken.

Another son of the second Stephen, Robert Woodward Barnwell, P. E. bishop, born in Beaufort, South Carolina, 16 August 1840; died in Sewanee, Tennessee, 26 August 1887, was graduated at the College of South Carolina in 1861, and rose to the rank of major in the Confederate army. He took deacon's orders at Rome, Georgia, in 1868, and studied in the General theological seminary, New York City, officiating while there as an assistant minister. He was ordained a priest in Savannah, Georgia, in 1871, and in November of that year became pastor of St. Philip's Church in that City, which rapidly increased in numbers under his ministry. On 15 November 1874, he was consecrated missionary bishop of western Texas, and took up his residence in San Antonio.

William Elliott, brother of the first Stephen, patriot of the Revolution, born in Beaufort, South Carolina, in 1761 ; died there in 1808. He served in the patriot army while still a youth, and was taken prisoner at the surprise of John's island, and confined in the prison ship. After the war he applied himself with success to repairing the damage done to his estates, was a promoter of various charitable and educational enterprises and public improvements, and served with distinction in both branches of the legislature.

Willam's son, William Elliott, author, 13. in Beaufort, South Carolina, 27 April 1788; died there in February 1863, entered Harvard at the age of eighteen, and took a high rank of scholarship in his class; his health failing him, he was obliged to return home before completing his studies, but his degree was conferred upon him in 1810. During the nullification crisis in South Carolina in 1832 he was a senator in the state legislature, but resigned upon being instructed by his constituents to vote to nullify the tariff law, not believing in the right of nullification, though unalterably opposed to protection. He afterward devoted himself to agriculture and rural sports, and occasionally published essays on rural economy, controversial articles on political science and economics, sporting sketches signed" Venator" and " Piscator," and poems, mid delivered many addresses before agricultural societies. His letters against secession, signed "Agricola," and published in 1851, were among his latest expressions of opinion upon political subjects. He contributed largely to the periodical press of the south, especially the "Southern Review." His published works include an "Address before the St. Paul's Agricultural Society" (Charleston, 1850), and "Carolina Sports by Land and Water" (1856). He was also the author of "Fiesco," a tragedy (1850).

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