Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum
   You are in: Museum of History >> Hall of North and South Americans >> William Coddington

 

Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889 and 1999. Virtualology.com warns that these 19th Century biographies contain errors and bias. We rely on volunteers to edit the historic biographies on a continual basis. If you would like to edit this biography please submit a rewritten biography in text form . If acceptable, the new biography will be published above the 19th Century Appleton's Cyclopedia Biography citing the volunteer editor

 



Virtual American Biographies

Over 30,000 personalities with thousands of 19th Century illustrations, signatures, and exceptional life stories. Virtualology.com welcomes editing and additions to the biographies. To become this site's editor or a contributor Click Here or e-mail Virtualology here.



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 





Click on an image to view full-sized

William Coddington

CODDINGTON, William, founder of the colony of Rhode Island, born in Lincolnshire, England, in 1601; died 1 November, 1678. He was one of the Massachusetts magistrates appointed by the crown, and arrived at Salem in the ship "Arabella," in 1630. While exercising his judicial functions, he traded as a merchant in Boston, and accumulated real estate at Braintree. With Governor Vane, he sympathized with the Antinomian party, and at the general election of May, 1637, when Winthrop superseded Vane as governor, Coddington's name was dropped from the roll, but on the following day both he and Vane were elected deputies to the court from Boston. When Mrs. Hutchinson was tried, Coddington undertook her defense against Winthrop and his party, and also unsuccessfully opposed the banishment of Wheelwright and other Antinomians. Wishing to enjoy peace, eighteen of the party, led by Coddington and John Clark, removed in 1638, intending to settle on Long Island, or Delaware bay, but, by the advice of Roger Williams, selected the island of Aquidneck, now Rhode Island, for their home. Having drawn up and signed an agreement to be "judged and guided by the absolute laws of Christ," Coddington was elected judge or chief magistrate, with a council of three elders, who were enjoined by a vote of the freemen to be guided by God's laws. At a general election, held in Newport, 12 March, 1640, the titles of judge and elder were abolished, and Coddington was elected governor, with a deputy and four assistants. He continued in office until a charter was obtained and the island incorporated with the Providence plantations in 1647, when John Coggeshall became president of the colony, and Coddington was chosen assistant from Newport. He was made president in 1648, but did not enter on the duties of .the office. At this time, owing to the disturbed state of the colony, he formed the project of withdrawing the island of Aquidneck from its rule. In September, with Capt. Partridge, he presented a petition begging that the island might be received into a league with the united New England colonies, which was refused, on the ground that Aquidneck rightfully belonged to Plymouth. Failing in his designs, Coddington went to England in 1649, and, after a delay of two years, obtained from the council of state a commission to govern the islands of Rhode Island and Conanicut during his life. In the autumn of that year the colonists, including those of Newport and Portsmouth, urged Roger Williams and John Clark to go to England to secure the revocation of Coddington's commission. This they succeeded in doing in October, 1652, and Coddington's "usurpation" was at an end. But he refused to give up the records, and it was not until 1655 that he formally submitted to the colony. He united with the Quakers in 1665, and in 1674 was chosen governor of the colony. He was re-elected in 1675, and again in 1678, just before his death. He published "Demonstration of True Love unto the Rulers of Massachusetts, by one who was in authority with them" (1674). There is an alleged portrait of Governor Coddington in the council-chamber at Newport. The accompanying illustration is a representation of his house at Newport. See "William Coddington in Rhode Island Colonial Affairs" (No. 4 of "Rhode Island Historical Tracts," Providence, 1878).

--BEGIN-John CODMAN

CODMAN, John, clergyman, born in Boston, Massachusetts, 3 August, 1782; died in Dorchester, 23 December, 1847. His father, John, was a Boston merchant and a member of the Massachusetts senate. Young Codman was graduated at Harvard in 1802, and began the study of law; but, in accordance with his father's dying wish, he abandoned it for theology. After studying at Cambridge, Massachusetts, he went to Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1805, and spent three years abroad, during the last of which he preached at the Scotch church in Swallow street, London. He returned to the United States in 3Iay, 1808, and in December became pastor of the recently organized second church at Dorchester, Massachusetts, where he remained until his death. During the early part of his pastorate he caused dissatisfaction in his congregation by refusing to exchange with clergymen whose orthodoxy was doubtful, and this finally led to the organization of a new church. The excitement produced by his course was so great that he was on one occasion forcibly kept out of his pulpit. In 1834-'5 Dr. Codman was a delegate to the Congregational union of England and Wales, and he again visited Europe in 1845. He inherited wealth from his father, and gave freely. Among his gifts were a large sum of money to Princeton theological seminary, and his library of several thousand volumes to Andover. Dr. Codman published numerous sermons, many of which were afterward collected in a volume (1834), and" A Visit to England" (1836). A memoir by Dr. William Alien, with six select sermons, was published after his death (1853).--His son, John, born in Dorchester, Massachusetts, 16 October, 1814, left Amherst in his junior year, 1833, and finished his education on the sea, becoming a captain in the merchant marine. He has travelled widely, and is known as an advocate of free ships and free-trade. He has contributed to periodicals, and published "Sailors' Life and Sailors' Yarns" (New York, 1846); "Ten Months in Brazil" (1872); "The Mormon Country" (1876); and "The Round Trip" (1881).

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

Start your search on William Coddington.


 

 

 



Unauthorized Site: This site and its contents are not affiliated, connected, associated with or authorized by the individual, family, friends, or trademarked entities utilizing any part or the subject's entire name. Any official or affiliated sites that are related to this subject will be hyper linked below upon submission and Evisum, Inc. review.

Copyright© 2000 by Evisum Inc.TM. All rights reserved.
Evisum Inc.TM Privacy Policy

Search:

About Us

 

 

Image Use

In this powerful, historic work, Stanley Yavneh Klos unfolds the complex 15-year U.S. Founding period revealing, for the first time, four distinctly different United American Republics.  This is history on a splendid scale -- a book about the not quite unified American Colonies and States that would eventually form a fourth republic, with only 11 states, the United States of America: We The People Click Here

 

Childhood & Family

Click Here

 

Historic Documents

Articles of Association

Articles of Confederation 1775

Articles of Confederation

Article the First

Coin Act

Declaration of Independence

Declaration of Independence

Emancipation Proclamation

Gettysburg Address

Monroe Doctrine

Northwest Ordinance

No Taxation Without Representation

Thanksgiving Proclamations

Mayflower Compact

Treaty of Paris 1763

Treaty of Paris 1783

Treaty of Versailles

United Nations Charter

United States In Congress Assembled

US Bill of Rights

United States Constitution

US Continental Congress

US Constitution of 1777

US Constitution of 1787

Virginia Declaration of Rights

 

Historic Events

Battle of New Orleans

Battle of Yorktown

Cabinet Room

Civil Rights Movement

Federalist Papers

Fort Duquesne

Fort Necessity

Fort Pitt

French and Indian War

Jumonville Glen

Manhattan Project

Stamp Act Congress

Underground Railroad

US Hospitality

US Presidency

Vietnam War

War of 1812

West Virginia Statehood

Woman Suffrage

World War I

World War II

 

Is it Real?



Declaration of
Independence

Digital Authentication
Click Here

 

America’s Four Republics
The More or Less United States

 
Continental Congress
U.C. Presidents

Peyton Randolph

Henry Middleton

Peyton Randolph

John Hancock

  

Continental Congress
U.S. Presidents

John Hancock

Henry Laurens

John Jay

Samuel Huntington

  

Constitution of 1777
U.S. Presidents

Samuel Huntington

Samuel Johnston
Elected but declined the office

Thomas McKean

John Hanson

Elias Boudinot

Thomas Mifflin

Richard Henry Lee

John Hancock
[
Chairman David Ramsay]

Nathaniel Gorham

Arthur St. Clair

Cyrus Griffin

  

Constitution of 1787
U.S. Presidents

George Washington 

John Adams
Federalist Party


Thomas Jefferson
Republican* Party

James Madison 
Republican* Party

James Monroe
Republican* Party

John Quincy Adams
Republican* Party
Whig Party

Andrew Jackson
Republican* Party
Democratic Party


Martin Van Buren
Democratic Party

William H. Harrison
Whig Party

John Tyler
Whig Party

James K. Polk
Democratic Party

David Atchison**
Democratic Party

Zachary Taylor
Whig Party

Millard Fillmore
Whig Party

Franklin Pierce
Democratic Party

James Buchanan
Democratic Party


Abraham Lincoln 
Republican Party

Jefferson Davis***
Democratic Party

Andrew Johnson
Republican Party

Ulysses S. Grant 
Republican Party

Rutherford B. Hayes
Republican Party

James A. Garfield
Republican Party

Chester Arthur 
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland
Democratic Party

Benjamin Harrison
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland 
Democratic Party

William McKinley
Republican Party

Theodore Roosevelt
Republican Party

William H. Taft 
Republican Party

Woodrow Wilson
Democratic Party

Warren G. Harding 
Republican Party

Calvin Coolidge
Republican Party

Herbert C. Hoover
Republican Party

Franklin D. Roosevelt
Democratic Party

Harry S. Truman
Democratic Party

Dwight D. Eisenhower
Republican Party

John F. Kennedy
Democratic Party

Lyndon B. Johnson 
Democratic Party 

Richard M. Nixon 
Republican Party

Gerald R. Ford 
Republican Party

James Earl Carter, Jr. 
Democratic Party

Ronald Wilson Reagan 
Republican Party

George H. W. Bush
Republican Party 

William Jefferson Clinton
Democratic Party

George W. Bush 
Republican Party

Barack H. Obama
Democratic Party

Please Visit

Forgotten Founders
Norwich, CT

Annapolis Continental
Congress Society


U.S. Presidency
& Hospitality

© Stan Klos

 

 

 

 


Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum