Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum
   You are in: Museum of History >> Hall of North and South Americans >> William Miller





American’s Four United Republics: Discovery-Based Curriculum

For more information go to Historic.us

 

Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889 and 1999. Virtualology.com warns that these 19th Century biographies contain errors and bias. We rely on volunteers to edit the historic biographies on a continual basis. If you would like to edit this biography please submit a rewritten biography in text form . If acceptable, the new biography will be published above the 19th Century Appleton's Cyclopedia Biography citing the volunteer editor





Virtual American Biographies

Over 30,000 personalities with thousands of 19th Century illustrations, signatures, and exceptional life stories. Virtualology.com welcomes editing and additions to the biographies. To become this site's editor or a contributor Click Here or e-mail Virtualology here.



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 





Click on an image to view full-sized

William Miller

A Stan Klos Edited Biography

MILLER, William, founder of the sect of Adventists, or "Millerites," born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, 5 February, 1782; died in Low Hampton, New York, 20 December, 1849. His father, Captain William Miller, was a soldier of the Revolution and of the war of 1812. His mother was the daughter of Elnathan Phelps, of Pittsfield, Massachusetts, a popular Baptist clergyman.

 

Religious meetings were often held in his father's house, and the zeal of the exhorters and revivalists had much to do with shaping the boy's career, who had little else to break the monotony of his farm life. The few books he could borrow were mainly religious, stimulating the morbid tendency of his mind, but he earned copies of "Robinson Crusoe" and "The Adventures of Robert Boyle" by chopping wood.

 

He became a prosperous Green Mountain farmer, was a recruiting-officer at the beginning of the war of 1812, and a captain at Plattsburgh. He owned a farm of 200 acres unencumbered, and was a justice of the peace, constable, and sheriff. He was a ready and smooth versifier, and was called the "poet of Low Hampton." In his early manhood he read Hume, Voltaire, and Tom Paine, and advocated their teachings.

 

He afterward professed faith in Christianity, uniting with the Baptist Church at Low Hampton, when his absorbing study of the Bible began. "I lost all taste for other reading," he wrote of this period. He began with Genesis, and left not a sentence unstudied, accepting no help or direction beyond the concordance and the reference of his polyglot Bible. He was guided in his interpretation entirely by his private judgment, and ultimately concentrated his attention upon the prophecies, particularly those of the second coming.

 

In 1831 he rose from his prolonged study under a solemn conviction that to him had been given the key unlocking the prophetical numbers, and that he must go forth and proclaim to a doomed world that in twelve years, at longest, the end of all things would come; that some time between 21 March, 1843, and 21 March, 1844, Jesus Christ would appear in person to judge the world.

 

He was licensed to preach by the Baptist church at Low Hampton, but was never ordained. Multitudes pressed to hear him wherever he went, and he could not respond to the numerous invitations he received to lecture upon the prophecies. He paid his own expenses as a rule, and there was no admission-fee to his lectures. Churches were thrown open to him everywhere at first--excepting those of the Episcopalians and Roman Catholics--and many prominent clergymen became advocates of his doctrine.

 

The tide of his popularity turned when some of his converts fastened the name of "Babylon" upon the churches, calling upon "believers in the blessed hope" to "come out of her" if they would be saved.

 

 Father Miller's lectures were illustrated by great charts, upon which were depicted the apocalyptic beasts, Nebuchadnezzar's image, etc. These charts presented a mathematical demonstration of the mystical problem of the 2,300 days of Daniel's vision, showing just when "the third woe" must be sounded, and the seventh trumpet, and just when the stone must smite the image, etc.

 

The vital point of his argument was the connection between the seventy weeks of Daniel and the 2,300 days, and therein was the revelation of the exact time of the end. The grand culmination of the fanaticism was 24-25 October, 1844, "the tenth day of the seventh month" excitement.

 

The mistake in fixing upon 1843, it was shown, grew out of a neglect to consider the difference between Roman and Jewish time; 1843 Jewish time was 1844 Roman time, and the new revelation had given not only the year but the month and the day, "and probably the hour even." The clue had been found in the fact that the tenth day of the seventh month was that of the great day of the atonement. The literature of the "tenth-day excitement" may be found in the many publications of the sect at the time, and is by no means discreditable to its authors.

 

Naturally there was intense excitement among the believers, until not only the month of October but that of November had passed. They gathered themselves together in great multitudes, and hundreds were baptized by immersion. They did not array themselves in ascension-robes, as has been universally believed. The offshoots of the fanaticism were many, each founded on some interpretation of Scripture according to private judgment.

 

One Mrs. Miner, of Philadelphia, went to Palestine to make ready that land for the tarrying Messiah. There was a "shut-door" faction, which asserted that Christ came spiritually on the tenth day, and had "shut the door" against all unbelievers. The "Feet-Washers" were another phase of the reaction from disappointment. There was a marked drift to the Shakers, while many went back to "Babylon," thankful for the refuge.

 

But the majority of Father Miller's converts, 50,000 or more, did not forsake their leader, nor give up their faith in the speedy appearing. On 25 April, 1845, he called a convention of his followers, a declaration of faith was agreed upon, and the name of "Adventist" was adopted by the new sect, which, under various names, has been increasing ever since. Father Miller published many sermons and lectures, and his "Dream of the Last Day" had a large circulation. See "Memoirs of William Miller," by Sylvester Bliss (Boston, 1853).

 

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia by John Looby, Copyright © 2001 StanKlos.comTM

MILLER, William, founder of the sect of Adventists, or "Millerites," born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, 5 February, 1782" died in Low Hampton, New York, 20 December, 1849. His father, Captain William Miller, was a soldier of the Revolution and of the war of 1812. His mother was the daughter of Elnathan Phelps, of Pittsfield, Massachusetts, a popular Baptist clergyman. Religious meetings were often held in his father's house, and the zeal of the exhorters and revivalists had much to do with shaping the boy's career, who had little else to break the monotony of his farm life. The few books he could borrow were mainly religious, stimulating the morbid tendency of his mind" but he earned copies of " Robinson Crusoe" and "The Adventures of Robert Boyle" by chopping wood. He became a prosperous Green mountain farmer, was a recruiting-officer at the beginning of the war of 1812, and a captain at Plattsburg. He owned a farm of 200 acres unencumbered, and was a justice of the peace, constable, and sheriff. He was a ready and smooth versifier, and was called the "poet of Low Hampton." In his early manhood he read Hume, Voltaire, and Tom Paine, and advocated their teachings. He afterward professed faith in Christianity, uniting with the Baptist church at Low Hampton, when his absorbing study of the Bible began. "I lost all taste for other reading," he wrote of this period. He began with Genesis, and left not a sentence unstudied, accepting no help or direction beyond the concordance and the reference of his polyglot Bible. He was guided in his interpretation entirely by his private judgment, and ultimately concentrated his attention upon the prophecies, particularly those of the second coming, in 1831 he rose from his prolonged study under a solemn conviction that to him had been given the key unlocking the prophetical numbers, and that he must go forth and proclaim to a doomed world that in twelve years, at longest, the end of all things would come ; that some time between 21 March, 1843, and 21 March, 1844, Jesus Christ would appear in person to judge the world. He was licensed to preach by the Baptist church at Low Hampton, but was never ordained. Multitudes pressed to hear him wherever he went, and he could not respond to the numerous invitations he received to lecture upon the prophecies. He paid his own expenses as a rule, and there was no admission-fee to his lectures. Churches were thrown open to him everywhere at first--excepting those of the Episcopalians and Roman Catholics--and many prominent clergymen became advocates of his doctrine. The tide of his popularity turned when some of his converts fastened the name of "Babylon" upon the churches, calling upon "believers in the blessed hope" to "come out of her" if they would be saved. Father Miller's lectures were illustrated by great charts, upon which were depicted the apocalyptic beasts, Nebuchadnezzar's image, etc. These charts presented a mathematical demonstration of the mystical problem of the 2.300 days of Daniel's vision, showing just when "the third woe" must be sounded, and the seventh trumpet, and just when the stone must smite the image, etc. The vital point of his argument was the connection between the seventy weeks of Daniel and the 2,300 days, and therein was the revelation of the exact time of the end. The grand culmination of the fanaticism was 24-25 October, 1844, "the tenth day of the seventh month" excitement. The mistake in fixing upon 1843, it was shown, grew out of a neglect to consider the difference between Roman and Jewish time; 1843 Jewish time was 1844 Roman time, and the new revelation had given not only the year but the month and the day, "and probably the hour even." The clew had been found in the fact that the tenth day of the seventh month was that of the great day of the atonement. The literature of the "tenth-day excitement" may be found in the many publications of the sect a15 the time, and is by no means discreditable to its authors. Naturally there was intense excitement among the believers, until not only the month of October but that of November had passed. They gathered themselves together in great multitudes, and hundreds were baptized by immersion. They did not array themselves in ascension-robes, as 'has been universally believed. The offshoots of the fanaticism were many, each founded on some interpretation of Scripture according to private judgment. One Mrs. Miner, of Philadelphia, went to Palestine to make ready that land for the tarrying Messiah. There was a "shut-door" faction, which asserted that Christ came spiritually on the tenth day, and had "shut too the door" against all unbelievers. The "Feet-Washers" were another phase of the reaction from disappointment. There was a marked drift to the Shakers, while many went back to "Babylon," thankful for the refuge. But the majority of Father Miller's converts, 50,000 or more, did not forsake their leader, nor give up their faith in the speedy appearing. On 25 April, 1845, he called a convention of his followers, a declaration of faith was agreed upon, and the name of "Adventist" was adopted by the new sect, which, under various names, has been increasing ever since. Father Miller published many sermons and lectures, and his "Dream of the Last Day " had a large circulation. See "Memoirs of William Miller," by Sylvester Bliss (Boston, 1853).

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

Start your search on William Miller.


 

 


 


Unauthorized Site: This site and its contents are not affiliated, connected, associated with or authorized by the individual, family, friends, or trademarked entities utilizing any part or the subject's entire name. Any official or affiliated sites that are related to this subject will be hyper linked below upon submission and Evisum, Inc. review.

Copyright© 2000 by Evisum Inc.TM. All rights reserved.
Evisum Inc.TM Privacy Policy

Search:

About Us

 

 

Image Use

Please join us in our mission to incorporate America's Four United Republics discovery-based curriculum into the classroom of every primary and secondary school in the United States of America by July 2, 2026, the nation’s 250th birthday. , the United States of America: We The People Click Here

 

Childhood & Family

Click Here

 

Historic Documents

Articles of Association

Articles of Confederation 1775

Articles of Confederation

Article the First

Coin Act

Declaration of Independence

Declaration of Independence

Emancipation Proclamation

Gettysburg Address

Monroe Doctrine

Northwest Ordinance

No Taxation Without Representation

Thanksgiving Proclamations

Mayflower Compact

Treaty of Paris 1763

Treaty of Paris 1783

Treaty of Versailles

United Nations Charter

United States In Congress Assembled

US Bill of Rights

United States Constitution

US Continental Congress

US Constitution of 1777

US Constitution of 1787

Virginia Declaration of Rights

 

Historic Events

Battle of New Orleans

Battle of Yorktown

Cabinet Room

Civil Rights Movement

Federalist Papers

Fort Duquesne

Fort Necessity

Fort Pitt

French and Indian War

Jumonville Glen

Manhattan Project

Stamp Act Congress

Underground Railroad

US Hospitality

US Presidency

Vietnam War

War of 1812

West Virginia Statehood

Woman Suffrage

World War I

World War II

 

Is it Real?



Declaration of
Independence

Digital Authentication
Click Here

 

America’s Four Republics
The More or Less United States

 
Continental Congress
U.C. Presidents

Peyton Randolph

Henry Middleton

Peyton Randolph

John Hancock

  

Continental Congress
U.S. Presidents

John Hancock

Henry Laurens

John Jay

Samuel Huntington

  

Constitution of 1777
U.S. Presidents

Samuel Huntington

Samuel Johnston
Elected but declined the office

Thomas McKean

John Hanson

Elias Boudinot

Thomas Mifflin

Richard Henry Lee

John Hancock
[
Chairman David Ramsay]

Nathaniel Gorham

Arthur St. Clair

Cyrus Griffin

  

Constitution of 1787
U.S. Presidents

George Washington 

John Adams
Federalist Party


Thomas Jefferson
Republican* Party

James Madison 
Republican* Party

James Monroe
Republican* Party

John Quincy Adams
Republican* Party
Whig Party

Andrew Jackson
Republican* Party
Democratic Party


Martin Van Buren
Democratic Party

William H. Harrison
Whig Party

John Tyler
Whig Party

James K. Polk
Democratic Party

David Atchison**
Democratic Party

Zachary Taylor
Whig Party

Millard Fillmore
Whig Party

Franklin Pierce
Democratic Party

James Buchanan
Democratic Party


Abraham Lincoln 
Republican Party

Jefferson Davis***
Democratic Party

Andrew Johnson
Republican Party

Ulysses S. Grant 
Republican Party

Rutherford B. Hayes
Republican Party

James A. Garfield
Republican Party

Chester Arthur 
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland
Democratic Party

Benjamin Harrison
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland 
Democratic Party

William McKinley
Republican Party

Theodore Roosevelt
Republican Party

William H. Taft 
Republican Party

Woodrow Wilson
Democratic Party

Warren G. Harding 
Republican Party

Calvin Coolidge
Republican Party

Herbert C. Hoover
Republican Party

Franklin D. Roosevelt
Democratic Party

Harry S. Truman
Democratic Party

Dwight D. Eisenhower
Republican Party

John F. Kennedy
Democratic Party

Lyndon B. Johnson 
Democratic Party 

Richard M. Nixon 
Republican Party

Gerald R. Ford 
Republican Party

James Earl Carter, Jr. 
Democratic Party

Ronald Wilson Reagan 
Republican Party

George H. W. Bush
Republican Party 

William Jefferson Clinton
Democratic Party

George W. Bush 
Republican Party

Barack H. Obama
Democratic Party

Please Visit

Forgotten Founders
Norwich, CT

Annapolis Continental
Congress Society


U.S. Presidency
& Hospitality

© Stan Klos

 

 

 

 


Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum