Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum
   You are in: Museum of History >> Hall of North and South Americans >> William Moultrie

Dad, why are you a Republican?

Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889 and 1999. Virtualology.com warns that these 19th Century biographies contain errors and bias. We rely on volunteers to edit the historic biographies on a continual basis. If you would like to edit this biography please submit a rewritten biography in text form . If acceptable, the new biography will be published above the 19th Century Appleton's Cyclopedia Biography citing the volunteer editor

 



Virtual American Biographies

Over 30,000 personalities with thousands of 19th Century illustrations, signatures, and exceptional life stories. Virtualology.com welcomes editing and additions to the biographies. To become this site's editor or a contributor Click Here or e-mail Virtualology here.



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 





Click on an image to view full-sized

William Moultrie

MOULTRIE, William, patriot, born in England in 1731; died in Charleston, South Carolina, 27 September, 1805. His father, Dr. John Moultrie, came to this country from Scotland about 1733 and practised with reputation in Charleston until his death in 1773. William in 1761 was appointed a captain of foot in a militia regiment that was raised to defend the South Carolina frontier against the incursions of the Cherokees. He thus gained a knowledge of military affairs that proved of value to him in the subsequent war of independence. At the beginning of the Revolutionary war Moultrie at once espoused the patriot cause, although several of his family remained loyal to the crown. He was appointed to the command of the 2d colonial regiment, and also represented the parish of St. Helena in the Continental congress of 1775. Early in June, 1776, on the approach of a British land and naval force under Sir Henry Clinton and Admiral Sir Peter Parker to invest Charleston, Moultrie was ordered to complete a fortress on Sullivan's island, at the mouth of the harbor, which he had been engaged in building since the previous March, and he was still busy at the work when the enemy made his appearance. On the morning of the 28th five of the fleet began to cannonade the unfinished fortification ; but the repeated broadsides produced little or no effect, owing to the soft, spongy character of the palmetto-wood of which it was constructed. Colonel Moultrie, on the other hand, having but a limited supply of ammunition, discharged his guns with such deliberation that every shot told upon the hulls or rigging of the enemy. So great was the slaughter on board the admiral's ship, the " Bristol," that at one time only Sir Peter Parker remained on the quarter-deck. At sunset, after a nine hours' engagement, only one of the guns on the fort having been dismounted, the enemy's fire began to slacken, the "Bristol" and "Experiment " being so riddled as almost to have become wrecks. At half-past nine in the evening the attack was abandoned, and several weeks after the discomfited squadron returned to the north. In commemoration of Moultrie's bravery in defending the fort it was subsequently called by his name. He was soon afterward commissioned brigadier-general in the Continental army, and had charge of the military interests of Georgia and South Carolina. In February, 1779, he defeated a superior British force under Colonel Gardiner near Beaufort, . In the latter part of April, General Augustine Prevost, taking advantage of the absence of General Benjamin Lincoln with most of the Continental troops in Georgia, advanced upon Charleston with a large force of British regulars and Tories. Mouitrie, who was stationed on the north side of Savannah river with 1,000 or 1,200 militia, hastened to throw himself in Prevost's path, and by retarding the progress of the enemy enabled the people of Charleston to place themselves in a condition of defence. The return of Lincoln from Georgia subsequently compelled Prevost to fall back on Savannah. Again in the spring of 1780 Charleston was attacked by a strong land and sea force, and Moultrie, who was second in command, shared in the capitulation of the American troops. During his imprisonment, which lasted nearly two years, he was several times approached by British officers with offers of pecuniary compensation and the command of a regiment in Jamaica if he would leave the American service. " Not the fee-simple of all Jamaica," was his reply, "should induce me to part with my integrity." After his release in 1782 congress made him a major-general, but too late to enable him to render his country any further service. In 1785 he was elected governor of South Carolina, and again in 1794. Retiring shortly afterward to private life, he devoted his remaining years to the preparation of his "Memoirs of the American Revolution so far as it Related to the States of North and South Carolina and Georgia" (2 vols., New York, 1802).--His elder brother, John, received the degree of M. D. at Edinburgh university, rose to eminence in his profession, and during the Revolution, espousing the royal cause, was governor of East Florida.--His cousin, James, physician, born in Charleston, South Carolina, 27 March, 1793; died there in April, 1869. He was graduated at the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1812, and succeeded his father as port physician of Charleston, South Carolina, and physician to the jail and the Magazine guards. In 1820 he was president of the State medical society, and on the organization of the Medical college of South Carolina in 1824 he was elected professor of anatomy, but declined. In 1833 he was elected to the chair of physiology and accepted, retaining it until 1867. On the formation of the American medical association in Philadelphia in 1847 he was chosen vice-president, and he was made president at the annual meeting at Charleston in 1851. He was devoted to the study of natural history, and in the intervals of his professional duties made large contributions to the different, departments of zoology. He was also a thorough musician, and pursued his investigations into the more recondite laws of acoustics governing musical sounds.

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

Start your search on William Moultrie.


 

 

 



Unauthorized Site: This site and its contents are not affiliated, connected, associated with or authorized by the individual, family, friends, or trademarked entities utilizing any part or the subject's entire name. Any official or affiliated sites that are related to this subject will be hyper linked below upon submission and Evisum, Inc. review.

Copyright© 2000 by Evisum Inc.TM. All rights reserved.
Evisum Inc.TM Privacy Policy

Search:

About Us

 

Contact Us 

 
Historic Document Exhibits

 

Image Use

 

In this powerful, historic work, Stan Klos unfolds the complex 15-year U.S. Founding period revealing, for the first time, four distinctly different United American Republics.  This is history on a splendid scale -- a book about the not quite unified American Colonies and States that would eventually form a fourth republic, with only 11 states, the United States of America: We The People Click Here

 

Historic Documents

Articles of Association

Articles of Confederation 1775

Articles of Confederation

Article the First

Coin Act

Declaration of Independence

Declaration of Independence

Emancipation Proclamation

Gettysburg Address

Monroe Doctrine

Northwest Ordinance

No Taxation Without Representation

Thanksgiving Proclamations

Mayflower Compact

Treaty of Paris 1763

Treaty of Paris 1783

Treaty of Versailles

United Nations Charter

United States In Congress Assembled

US Bill of Rights

United States Constitution

US Continental Congress

US Constitution of 1777

US Constitution of 1787

Virginia Declaration of Rights

 

Historic Events

Battle of New Orleans

Battle of Yorktown

Cabinet Room

Civil Rights Movement

Federalist Papers

Fort Duquesne

Fort Necessity

Fort Pitt

French and Indian War

Jumonville Glen

Manhattan Project

Stamp Act Congress

Underground Railroad

US Hospitality

US Presidency

Vietnam War

War of 1812

West Virginia Statehood

Woman Suffrage

World War I

World War II

 

Is it Real?



Declaration of
Independence

Digital Authentication
Click Here

 

America’s Four Republics
The More or Less United States

 
Continental Congress
U.C. Presidents

Peyton Randolph

Henry Middleton

Peyton Randolph

John Hancock

  

Continental Congress
U.S. Presidents

John Hancock

Henry Laurens

John Jay

Samuel Huntington

  

Constitution of 1777
U.S. Presidents

Samuel Huntington

Samuel Johnston
Elected but declined the office

Thomas McKean

John Hanson

Elias Boudinot

Thomas Mifflin

Richard Henry Lee

John Hancock
[
Chairman David Ramsay]

Nathaniel Gorham

Arthur St. Clair

Cyrus Griffin

  

Constitution of 1787
U.S. Presidents

George Washington 

John Adams
Federalist Party


Thomas Jefferson
Republican* Party

James Madison 
Republican* Party

James Monroe
Republican* Party

John Quincy Adams
Republican* Party
Whig Party

Andrew Jackson
Republican* Party
Democratic Party


Martin Van Buren
Democratic Party

William H. Harrison
Whig Party

John Tyler
Whig Party

James K. Polk
Democratic Party

David Atchison**
Democratic Party

Zachary Taylor
Whig Party

Millard Fillmore
Whig Party

Franklin Pierce
Democratic Party

James Buchanan
Democratic Party


Abraham Lincoln 
Republican Party

Jefferson Davis***
Democratic Party

Andrew Johnson
Republican Party

Ulysses S. Grant 
Republican Party

Rutherford B. Hayes
Republican Party

James A. Garfield
Republican Party

Chester Arthur 
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland
Democratic Party

Benjamin Harrison
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland 
Democratic Party

William McKinley
Republican Party

Theodore Roosevelt
Republican Party

William H. Taft 
Republican Party

Woodrow Wilson
Democratic Party

Warren G. Harding 
Republican Party

Calvin Coolidge
Republican Party

Herbert C. Hoover
Republican Party

Franklin D. Roosevelt
Democratic Party

Harry S. Truman
Democratic Party

Dwight D. Eisenhower
Republican Party

John F. Kennedy
Democratic Party

Lyndon B. Johnson 
Democratic Party 

Richard M. Nixon 
Republican Party

Gerald R. Ford 
Republican Party

James Earl Carter, Jr. 
Democratic Party

Ronald Wilson Reagan 
Republican Party

George H. W. Bush
Republican Party 

William Jefferson Clinton
Democratic Party

George W. Bush 
Republican Party

Barack H. Obama
Democratic Party

Please Visit

Forgotten Founders
Norwich, CT

Annapolis Continental
Congress Society


U.S. Presidency
& Hospitality

© Stan Klos

 

 

 

 


Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum